Dramatic Works: Printed from the Text of the Corrected Copies of Steevens and Malone (Google eBook)

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Page 76 - a kind of wit : He must observe their mood on whom he jests, The quality of persons, and the time ; And, like the haggard, check at every feather That comes before his eye. This is a practice, As full of labour a- a wise man's art : For folly, that he wisely shows, is fit ; But
Page 196 - her governor, her king. Myself, and what is mine, to you, and yours I» now converted : but now I was the lord Of this fair mansion, master of my servanti« Queen o'er myself; and even now, but now, This house, these servants, and this same myself, Are yours, my lord;
Page 186 - an infinite deal of nothing more than any man in all Venice: His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff; you shall seek all day ere you find them ; and, when you
Page 184 - (Without the which, I am not to be won), You shall this twelvemonth term from day today Visit the speechless sick, and still converse With groaning wretches; and your task shall be, With all the tierce endeavour of your wit, To enforce the pained impotent to smile. Biron. To move wild laughter in the throat
Page 397 - hot, and bleeding, will we offer them : The mailed Mars shall on his altar sit, Up to the ears in blood. I am on fire, To hear this rich reprisal is so nigh, And yet not ours:—Come, let me take my horse, Who is to bear me, like a thunderbolt, Against the bosom of the prince of
Page 180 - kiss'd away his hand in courtesy ; This Is the ape of form, monsieur the nice, That, when he plays at tables, chides the dice In honourable terms ; nay, he can sing A mean most meanly ; and, in ushering, Mend him who can; the ladies call him, sweet; The stain«, as he treads on them, kiss
Page 333 - I But who knows nothing, is once seen to smile; Where sighs, and groans, and shrieks that rent nothing, the air. Are made, not mark'd; where violent sorrow seems A modern ecstasy ; the dead man's knell Is there scarce ask'd, for who; and good men's lives Expire before the flowers in their caps, Dying, or ere they sicken.
Page 213 - begg'd The ring of me to give the worthy doctor. Por. Let not that doctor e'er come near my house ; Since he hath got the jewel that I lov'd, And that which you did swear to keep for me, I will become as liberal as you : I'll not deny him any
Page 335 - me now. I have liv'd long enough ; my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf: And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troop
Page 333 - and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye, The mere despair of surgery, he cures; Hanging a golden stamp about their necks, Put on "with holy prayer» : and 'tis spoken, To the succeeding royalty he leaves The healing benediction. With this strange

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