Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition

Front Cover
Counterpoint, 2001 - Philosophy - 153 pages
75 Reviews
[A] scathing assessment...Berry shows that Wilson's much-celebrated, controversial pleas in Consilience to unify all branches of knowledge is nothing more than a fatuous subordination of religion, art, and everything else that is good to science...Berry is one of the most perceptive critics of American society writing today.-Lauren F. Winner, Washington Post Book WorldI am tempted to say he understands [Consilience] better than Wilson himself...A new emancipation proclamation in which he speaks again and again about how to defy the tyranny of scientific materialism.-Colin C. Campbell, Christian Science MonitorBerry takes a wrecking ball to E. O. Wilson's Consilience, reducing its smug assumptions regarding the fusion of science, art, and religion to so much rubble.-Kirkus ReviewsIn Life Is a Miracle, the devotion of science to the quantitative and reductionist world is measured against the mysterious, qualitative suggestions of religion and art. Berry sees life as the collision of these separate forces, but without all three in the mix we are left at sea in the world.

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Review: Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

It's difficult for me NOT to love reading Wendell Berry vacillating between wanting to be in one place over time and despising my suburban upbringing. The occasion for Life is a Miracle is an book by ... Read full review

Review: Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition

User Review  - Stephen - Goodreads

A wonderful essay tackling the growing distance between art and science as fields of study towards simply economic engines. Berry points out many flaws in our current rationale towards research as only a tool towards upward mobility instead of fulfillment in a spiritual, and mental quest. Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Wendell Berry The prolific poet, novelist, and essayist Wendell Berry is a fifth-generation native of north central Kentucky. Berry taught at Stanford University; traveled to Italy and France on a Guggenheim Fellowship; and taught at New York University and the University of Kentucky, Lexington, before moving to Henry County. Berry owns and operates Lanes Landing Farm, a small, hilly piece of property on the Kentucky River. He embraced full-time farming as a career, using horses and organic methods to tend the land. Harmony with nature in general, and the farming tradition in particular, is a central theme of Berry's diverse work. As a poet, Berry gained popularity within the literary community. Collected Poems, 1957-1982, was particularly well-received. Novels and short stories set in Port William, a fictional town paralleling his real-life home town of Port Royal further established his literary reputation. The Memory of Old Jack, Berry's third novel, received Chicago's Friends of American Writers Award for 1975. Berry reached his broadest audience and attained his greatest popular acclaim through his essays. The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture is a springboard for contemporary environmental concerns. In his life as well as his art, Berry has advocated a responsible, contextual relationship with individuals in a local, agrarian economy.

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