Emma

Front Cover
Wild Jot Press, 2009 - Fiction - 298 pages
5 Reviews

Emma

By Jane Austen

"She always declares she will never marry, which, of course, means just nothing at all. But I have no idea that she has yet ever seen a man she cared for. It would not be a bad thing for her to be very much in love with a proper object. I should like to see Emma in love, and in some doubt of a return; it would do her good. But there is nobody hereabouts to attach her; and she goes so seldom from home."

"There does, indeed, seem as little to tempt her to break her resolution at present," said Mrs. Weston, "as can well be; and while she is so happy at Hartfield, I cannot wish her to be forming any attachment which would be creating such difficulties on poor Mr. Woodhouse's account. I do not recommend matrimony at present to Emma, though I mean no slight to the state, I assure you."

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - FHC - LibraryThing

Penguin Readers with cd audio was my traveling companion this weekend. An adaptation of Emma, published in 2008, and illustrated with photos of the 1996 Miramax movie version. There are chapter ... Read full review

Review: Emma

User Review  - Fenia - Goodreads

Re-reading Jane Austen is always a joy. It just feels like home. Its familiar. I love her so much. I don't think i will ever get bored of re-reading her books. And Emma is so witty and a great novel and just..WHERE IS MY MR.KNIGHTLEY? Or any Austen male character??? ♥ Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2009)

Jane Austen's life is striking for the contrast between the great works she wrote in secret and the outward appearance of being quite dull and ordinary. Austen was born in the small English town of Steventon in Hampshire, and educated at home by her clergyman father. She was deeply devoted to her family. For a short time, the Austens lived in the resort city of Bath, but when her father died, they returned to Steventon, where Austen lived until her death at the age of 41. Austen was drawn to literature early, she began writing novels that satirized both the writers and the manners of the 1790's. Her sharp sense of humor and keen eye for the ridiculous in human behavior gave her works lasting appeal. She is at her best in such books as Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816), in which she examines and often ridicules the behavior of small groups of middle-class characters. Austen relies heavily on conversations among her characters to reveal their personalities, and at times her novels read almost like plays. Several of them have, in fact, been made into films. She is considered to be one of the most beloved British authors.

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