The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy left by G. Steevens, with a selection of notes from the most emient commentators, &c., by A. Chalmers (Google eBook)

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1805
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Page 154 - Musick, whilst BASSANIO comments on the caskets to himself. SONG. 1. Tell me, where is fancy* bred, Or in the heart, or in the head ? How begot, how nourished ? Reply. 2. It is engender'd in the eyes, With gazing fed; and fancy dies In the cradle where it lies : Let us all ring fancy's knell;
Page 177 - scepter'd sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this,— That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: 9
Page 243 - And so he plays his part: The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon; With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side; His youthful hose, well sav'd, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
Page 186 - And saw the lion's shadow ere himself, And ran dismay'd away. Jes. . In such a night, Lor. In such a night, Stood Dido with a willow in her hand Upon the wild sea-banks, and wav'd her love To come again to Carthage. Jes. In such a night, Medea gather'd the enchanted herbs That did renew old JEson.
Page 154 - bred, Or in the heart, or in the head ? How begot, how nourished ? Reply. 2. It is engender'd in the eyes, With gazing fed; and fancy dies In the cradle where it lies : Let us all ring fancy's knell; Fll begin it, Ding dong, bell. All. Ding, dong, bell. Bass.—So may the outward
Page 123 - Still have I borne it with a patient shrug; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe: You call me—misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own. Well then, it now appears, you need my help: Go to then; you come to me, and you say, Shylock,
Page 272 - all the benefits of your own country; be out of love with your nativity, and almost chide God for making you that countenance you are; or I will scarce think you have swam in a gondola. 9 —Why, how now, Orlando! 7 which is nice;] ie silly, trifling. 8 disable—] ie undervalue.
Page 226 - Ami. I would not change it: Happy is your grace, That can translate the stubbornness of fortune Into so quiet and so sweet a style. Duke S. Come, shall we go and kill us venison ? And yet it irks me, the poor dappled fools,— Being native burghers of this desert city,— Should, in their own confines, with forked heads
Page 120 - Shy. I will be assured, I may; and, that I may be assured, I will bethink me: May I speak with Antonio ? Bass. Be assured you may. Bass. If it please you to dine with us. Shy. Yes, to smell pork; to eat of the habitation which your prophet, the Nazarite, conjured the devil into:
Page 157 - And leave itself unfurnish'd: Yet look, how far The substance of my praise doth wrong this shadow In underprizing it, so far this shadow Doth limp behind the substance.—Here's the scroll, The continent and summary of my fortune. You that choose not by the view, Chance as fair, and choose as true! Since this fortune

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