American Medical Botany: Being a Collection of the Native Medicinal Plants of the United States, Containing Their Botanical History and Chemical Analysis, and Properties and Uses in Medicine, Diet and the Arts, with Coloured Engravings, Volumes 1-3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cummings and Hilliard, 1817 - Botany
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The importance of Jacob Bigelow's American Medical Botany, being a Collection of the Native Medicinal Plants of the United States, lies in its illustrations. Along with William Barton's Vegetable Materia Medica, publication of which was almost simultaneous, Bigelow's book was one of the first two American botanical books with colored illustrations. More significantly, Bigelow's work was the first book published in the United States to have plates printed in colors. Like Barton, Bigelow originally intended to illustrate his massive work in traditional fashion with hand-colored copperplates, hiring the engraver William B. Annin and numerous colorists to produce the plates for Vol. I, part 1. But, finding this process too slow and expensive, Bigelow searched for a method that would allow the swift and easy application of color directly onto the plate, as well as allow rapid cleaning of the plate between impressions. Richard Wolfe showed that Bigelow turned to a printing process involving etched stone, a technique developed in Europe shortly before Alois Senefelder's invention of lithography in 1795-1796; it is likely, however, that Bigelow and his engravers discovered this technique independently, as printing from stone was little known in America at this time. --
  

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Contents

I
17
II
34
III
39
IV
50
V
60
VI
66
VII
75
VIII
84
XXXI
97
XXXII
107
XXXIII
115
XXXIV
121
XXXV
137
XXXVI
142
XXXVII
148
XXXVIII
154

IX
90
X
96
XI
113
XII
125
XIII
133
XIV
142
XV
149
XVI
155
XVII
162
XVIII
171
XIX
181
XX
193
XXI
ix
XXII
15
XXIII
27
XXIV
34
XXV
41
XXVI
51
XXVII
59
XXVIII
67
XXIX
73
XXX
82
XXXIX
166
XL
172
XLI
11
XLII
19
XLIII
32
XLIV
44
XLV
49
XLVI
56
XLVII
61
XLVIII
74
XLIX
82
L
92
LI
101
LII
107
LIII
119
LIV
129
LV
134
LVI
141
LVII
147
LVIII
153
LIX
156
LX
163

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Page 135 - The gas was collected, and found to be a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, in the proportion of three parts of the former to one of the latter.
Page 201 - Bacon; and some of them eat plentifully of it, the effect of which was a very pleasant comedy; for they turned natural fools upon it for several days: one would blow up a feather in the air; another would dart straws at it with much fury; and another stark naked was sitting up in a corner, like a monkey...
Page 24 - Whether the Indians can so prepare that stupifying herb, Datura, that they make it lie several days, months, years, according as they will have it, in a man's body, without doing him any hurt, and at the end kill him without missing half an hour's time?
Page 201 - ... a fourth would fondly kiss and paw his companions, and sneer in their faces with a countenance more antic than any in a Dutch doll.
Page 29 - ... hours after exposure, and are commonly at the height on the fourth or fifth day, after which desquamation begins to take place, and the distress in most instances to diminish. Sometimes the eruption is less general, and confines itself to the part which has been exposed to contact with the poison. The symptoms of this malady, though often highly distressing, are rarely fatal. I have, nevertheless, been told of cases in which death appeared to be the consequence of the poison.
Page 55 - Red cedar being substituted for those of the Savin. When properly prepared by boiling the fresh leaves for a short time in about twice their weight of lard with the addition of a little wax, a cerate is formed of peculiar efficacy as a perpetual epispastic. When applied as a dressing to a newly vesicated surface, and afterwards repeated twice a day, it rarely fails to keep up the discharge for an indefinite length of time. Under its operation, the discharge...
Page 92 - Serpentaria in a pint of boiling Water, for two hours, in a covered vessel, and strain.
Page 204 - only when you have drank the poison, yon are to walk about until a heaviness takes place in your legs. Then lie down. This is all you have to do." At the same time he presented him the cup. Socrates received it from him with great calmness, without fear or change of countenance, and regarding the man with his usual stern aspect, he asked, " What say you of this potion ? Is it lawful to sprinkle any portion of it on the earth as a libation, or not ?" " We only bruise," said the man, " as much as...
Page 77 - Magnolia grandiflora; the land on which they stand is an exact level: the surface a shallow, loose, black mould, on a stratum of stiff, yellowish clay. These trees were about twelve feet high, spreading horizontally; their limbs meeting and interlocking with each other, formed one vast, shady, cool grove, so dense and humid as to exclude the sun-beams...
Page 172 - III., their efficacy as a general narcotic, when introduced into the stomach, has been investigated. Dr. Maton observed, that besides allaying pain and producing sleep, the preparation of hops reduces the frequency of the pulse, and increases its firmness in a very direct manner. One drachm of the tincture and four grains of the extract, given once in six hours, reduced the pulsations, in twenty- four hours, from ninety-six to sixty...

References from web pages

Jacob Bigelow. American medical botany. 1817-1820. - laneconnex ...
American medical botany being a collection of the native medicinal plants of the United States, containing their botanical history and chemical analysis, ...
lane.stanford.edu/ portals/ history/ bigelow.html

Bibliographic information