Silence

Front Cover
Taplinger Publishing Company, 1980 - Fiction - 201 pages
14 Reviews
Sustained by dreams of glorious martyrdom, a seventeenth-century Purtuguese missionary in Japan administers to the outlawed Christians until Japanese authorities capture him and force him to watch the torture of his followers, promising to stop if he will renounce Christ.

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Review: Silence

User Review  - Stephen - Goodreads

A tough one to recommend, how, I don't know, but here it goes: The defining moment of this tragedy comes early on. The story sets itself up as a world without escape, not even into the imagination ... Read full review

Review: Silence

User Review  - José-contemplates-Saturn's Aurora - Goodreads

Preamble Jesuit priest Francisco Xavier called Japan “the light of my heart…the country in the Orient most suited for Christianity”. Fact: Kakure or Japanese crypto-Christians, meeting in secret for ... Read full review

Contents

Translators Preface
vii
Prologue
7
Chapter 1
21
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (1980)

Shusaku Endo was born in Tokyo in 1923 and, with his family, converted to Catholicism while he was still a child. Much of his writing centers on the conflict this conversion engendered as he struggled to develop faith in a deity foreign to Japanese culture. His writings also reflect on his experiences during World War II during the bombings and the subsequent shortage of basic human necessities for the Japanese people. He explores the suffering endured and the inevitable shock wave upon human relationships and the human psyche. Endo graduated from Keio University and then journeyed to France after the war to continue his studies, but was forced to return to Japan because of illness. After a period of convalescence Endo decided on a writing career, publishing his first novel, Shiroihito, in 1955. His novel The Samurai, published in the United States in 1996, is considered one of his finest works. Endo's reputation is due in part to his exploration of moral dilemma as it relates to divergent cultures. Endo has won many literary awards. In 1982 he was elected to the Japan Arts Academy. Shusaku Endo died in 1996.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON has translated several works from the contemplative traditions of both East and West, as well as work by the great Japanese novelist Shusaku Endo. HUSTON SMITH, the author of "The World's Religions," is widely regarded as the most eloquent and accessible contemporary authority on the history of religions. He has taught at MIT and the University of California, Berkeley.

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