The Dialogues of Plato, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Charles Scribner's sons, 1902 - Philosophy
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Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Garrett Starr - Goodreads

I have always wanted this collection, but over the years I purchased other books instead. When our church moved into our current digs, this entire collection was hidden away in a back room and covered ... Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Pete Skimin - Goodreads

Picked up this entire set in excellent condition at a library sponsored used book sale for $60.00. hands down one of my best finds. Read full review

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Page 463 - For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh. This is a great mystery: but I speak concerning Christ and the church.
Page 447 - Crito, I owe a cock to Asclepius; will you remember to pay the debt? The debt shall be paid said Crito, is there anything else?
Page 447 - ... directions, and the man who gave him the poison now and then looked at his feet and legs; and after a while he pressed his foot hard and asked him if he could feel; and he said, no; and then his leg, and so upwards and upwards, and showed us that he was cold and stiff. And he felt them himself, and said: When the poison reaches the heart, that will be the end.
Page 223 - For all good poets, epic as well as lyric, compose their beautiful poems not by art, but because they are inspired and possessed.
Page 126 - ... of other excellent poets, who are the lyric poets; and these they set to music, and make their harmonies and rhythms quite familiar to the children's souls, in order that they may learn to be more gentle, and harmonious, and rhythmical, and so more fitted for speech and action; for the life of man in every part has need of harmony and rhythm.
Page 550 - But he who, having no touch of the Muses' madness in his soul, comes to the door and thinks that he will get into the temple by the help of artó he, I say, and his poetry are not admitted; the sane man disappears and is nowhere when he enters into rivalry with the madman.
Page 447 - And hitherto most of us had been able to control our sorrow ; but now when we saw him drinking, and saw too that he had finished the draught, we could no longer forbear, and in spite of myself my own tears were flowing fast ; so that I covered my face and wept, not for him, but at the thought of my own calamity in having to part from such a friend.
Page 536 - Very true, my good friend; and I hope that you will excuse me when you hear the reason, which is, that I am a lover of knowledge, and the men who dwell in the city are my teachers, and not the trees or the country.
Page 333 - I do believe that there are gods, and in a sense higher than that in which any of my accusers believe in them. And to you and to God I commit my cause, to be determined by you as is best for you and me.
Page 503 - Remember how in that communion only, beholding beauty with the eye of the mind, he will be enabled to bring forth, not images of beauty, but realities (for he has hold not of an image, but of...

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