The revolutionary Plutarch: exhibiting the most distinguished characters in the recent annals of the French republic [by - Stewarton]. New (2nd) (Google eBook)

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1805
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Page 165 - Were it permitted for a soldier to regret any one who has fallen in the service of his country, I might be excused for lamenting him, more than any other person; but it is some consolation to those who tenderly loved him, that as his life was honourable, so was his death glorious. His memory will be recorded in the annals of his country will be sacred to every British soldier, and embalmed in the recollection of a grateful posterity.
Page 76 - Frenchmen tpld their Prince, that by pressing his niece to his bosom, he should reward, instead of resenting, the first act of her life which she ever concealed from him. This young Princess had, in the dungeons of the Temple, early learned to know the little value of either jewels, rank, or life, as well as the real duty of humanity, and the worth of undeserved wretchedness ! * After some wandering in the wilds of inhospitable Prussia, the policy of Buonaparte to keep Louis XVIII.
Page 77 - Temple, early learned to know the little value of either jewels, rank, or life, as well as the real duty of humanity, and the worth of undeserved wretchedness ! After some wandering in the wilds of inhospitable Prussia, the policy of Buonaparte to keep Louis XVIII. at a distance from his kingdom, left him at last permission to inhabit the castle of the dethroned King of Poland at Warsaw, where, in more fortunate times, one of his own ancestors, Henry III. had ruled as a King where his maternal...
Page 12 - ... the other sovereigns of Europe " to put the King of France in a situation to establish in perfect liberty the foundations of a monarchical government equally agreeable to the rights of sovereigns and the welfare of the French." Whenever the other princes should agree to co-operate with them, " then and in that case their Majesties were determined to act promptly, and by mutual consent, with the forces necessary to obtain the end proposed by all of them. In the meantime they declared that they...
Page 70 - XVI. continually threatened with destruction. Under the windows of his apartments, he heard the act of accusation against himself, and all the other Bourbons, cried about, as preparatory to their condemnation, distributed from the presses of the notorious jacobin Prudhomme. At length his patience was exhausted ; and his personal safety, and the welfare of France, demanded that he should try to break the bondage under which he had for two years groaned. More fortunate, or rather less unfortunate,...
Page 167 - ... connected with the signal defeat of Anthony in one age, and of De Bruix in another. A terrific grandeur was at the same time impressed by the sight of so many bodies of men and horses mingled promiscuously together, while hundreds of cannon, darting forth scorching flames and metals mingled with heat, at once enlivened the gloom, and added to the multitude of victims. To crown the whole, an heroic chief, pierced with a mortal...
Page 274 - ... and to raise from out of the refuse of human nature, an army of assassins, rebels, and forgers under the command of the most immoral and most ambitious of all Governments, there would be no security in Europe for the existence of any state for public morality, nor even for the continuance of the principles of civilization. It is not my duty to discuss the means you may possess to secure Europe, by guaranteeing her against such dangers. I content myself with informing and proving to you, that...
Page 270 - ... years of victories, of a concurrence of events, and of the establishment of a noble nation, founded on the dangers and efforts of a glorious war, and a terrible revolution. In the midst of these means, Mr. Drake sees nothing but opportunities for intrigue, and the efforts of spies. " During my stay in Italy," he says to one of his correspondent!
Page 26 - France, and was enabled to remit to her, through secret channels, a yearly sum of one hundred louis d'ors, though not daring to write to her for fear of exposing himself. For four years the duke regularly sent this sum ; and it was not until the death of the servant at Hamburgh, in 1796, that the marchioness knew she was a widow, "and had to mourn two sons and a brother ; but at the same time that she owed her own and her children's existence to the most liberal and delicate of benefactors, who in...
Page 76 - At her marriage, the Duchess of Angouleme had received from her first cousins, the Emperor and Empress of Germany, a box of jewels ; and without informing any person...

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