The Fortress

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, 1999 - Fiction - 406 pages
12 Reviews
The Fortress is one of the most significant and fascinating novels to come out of the former Yugoslavia. Ahmet Shabo returns home to eighteenth-century Sarajevo from the war in Russia, numbed by the death in battle or suicide of nearly his entire military unit. In time he overcomes the anguish of war, only to find that he has emerged a reflective and contemplative man in a society that does not value, and will not tolerate, the subversive implications of these qualities.
  

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Review: The Fortress

User Review  - Shadia - Goodreads

A book I am always happy to go back to! My high school book that I fell in love with :) Where Mesa Selimovic is concerned, I can hardly make any criticism to any of his work, nor do I have to, then ... Read full review

Review: The Fortress

User Review  - Nihada Prnjavorac - Goodreads

One of the best books I have ever read. Read full review

Contents

The Dniestr Marshes
3
Sadness and Laughter
13
Happiness Nonetheless
28
Enemy Country
54
Empty Space
76
A Strange Summer
103
The Dead Son
126
The Fear of Isolation
144
The Sorrow and the Fury
220
The Rescue
241
The Power of Love
270
Father and Son
292
The Epitaph
323
The Eternal Tracker
349
Death in Venice
373
The Fortress
394

A Tale of Childrens Flutes
160
A PureHearted Young Man
181
Ill Not Think of Ramiz
198
Glossary and References
401
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Mesa Selimovic (1910-82) is one of the most significant writers to emerge from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Born in Sarajevo, of Muslim descent, he brought to the literature of Yugoslavia an unprecedented psychological subtlety and an existential concern for characters at crucial moments of their lives. His novel Death and the Dervish was published by Northwestern University Press in 1996.

E. D. Goy was a lecturer in Slavonic studies at Cambridge for thirty-five years until his retirement in 1990.

Jasna Levinger was a lecturer in English language and sociolinguistics at the Universities of Sarajevo and Novi Sad. She now lives in Cambridge.

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