Guitar Zero: The Science of Becoming Musical at Any Age (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jan 19, 2012 - Music - 288 pages
27 Reviews
Just about every human being knows how to listen to music, but what does it take to make music? Is musicality something we are born with? Or a skill that anyone can develop at any time? If you don't start piano at the age of six, is there any hope? Is skill learning best left to children or can anyone reinvent him-or herself at any time?

For anyone who has ever set out to play a musical instrument—or wished that they could—Guitar Zero is an inspiring and fascinating look at the pursuit of music, the mechanics of the mind, and the surprising rewards that come from following one’s dreams. Gary Marcus, whom Steven Pinker describes as “one of the deepest thinkers in cognitive science,” debunks the popular theory that there is an innate musical instinct while challenging the idea that talent is only a myth. From deliberate and efficient practicing techniques to finding the right music teacher, Marcus translates his own experience—as well as reflections from world-renowned musicians—into practical advice for anyone hoping to become musical or learn any new skill.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - StephenBarkley - LibraryThing

Many people have told me, "I wish I followed through with my music lessons when I was a kid." The prevailing understanding is that it's much more difficult to learn a musical instrument when your ... Read full review

Review: Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning

User Review  - Jordan Kinsey - Goodreads

A terrific book for any music teacher. Marcus, a research psychologist and expert in cognitive development, decided to take up the guitar at age 40. This was his first foray into music, and his ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Gary Marcus, described by the New York Times as “one of the country’s best known cognitive psychologists,” directs the Center for Language and Music at New York University, where he studies language, music, cognitive development, and evolution. His previous book, Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind, was a New York Times Editors’ Choice pick.

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