Development, Crises and Alternative Visions: Third World Women's Perspectives

Front Cover
Earthscan, 1988 - Political Science - 120 pages
3 Reviews
More than half of the world's farmers are women. They are the majority of the poor, the uneducated and are the first to suffer from drought and famine. Yet their subordination is reinforced by well-meaning development policies that perpetuate social inequalities. During the 1975-85 United Nations Decade for the Advancement of Women their position actually worsened.This book analyses three decades of policies towards Third World women. Focusing on global economic and political crises - debt, famine, militarization, fundamentalism - the authors show how women's moves to organize effective strategies for basic survival are central to an understanding of the development process.
  

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Review: Development, Crises and Alternative Visions: Third World Women's Perspectives

User Review  - Amy - Goodreads

a good introduction to how world economics and politics affect poor women in developing countries. it's based on research conducted in the 80s but given the current economic climate, i expect many of the issues raised are at least as relevant today. Read full review

Review: Development, Crises and Alternative Visions: Third World Women's Perspectives

User Review  - Amy - Goodreads

a good introduction to how world economics and politics affect poor women in developing countries. it's based on research conducted in the 80s but given the current economic climate, i expect many of the issues raised are at least as relevant today. Read full review

Contents

Preamble
9
Introduction
15
Gender and Class in Development Experience
23
Systemic Crises Reproduction Failures
50
Alternative Visions Strategies and Methods
78
Notes
97
Bibliography
107
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About the author (1988)

Gita Sen and Caren Grown represent DAWN, a network of activists and researchers, largely in the Third World, committed to developing new strategies to attain social and economic justice, peace and development, free of all oppression by gender, class, race and nation.

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