The graduated series of reading-lesson books (Google eBook)

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Page 3 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 3 - IF I were to pray for a taste which should stand by me in stead under every variety of circumstances, and be a source of happiness and cheerfulness to me through life, and a shield against its ills, however things might go amiss, and the world frown upon me, it would be a taste for reading.
Page 24 - I beheld his body, half wasted away with long expectation and confinement, and felt what kind of sickness of the heart it was which arises from hone deferred. Upon looking nearer, I saw him pale and feverish ; in thirty years, the western breeze had not once fanned his blood ; he had seen no sun, no moon, in all that time ; nor had the voice of friend or kinsman breathed through his lattice. His children but here my heart began to bleed, and I was forced to go on with another part of the portrait.
Page 49 - There was no trace by which the name of the ship could be ascertained. The wreck had evidently drifted about for many months ; clusters of shell-fish had fastened about it, and long sea-weeds flaunted at its sides. But where, thought I, is the crew...
Page 3 - Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them...
Page 43 - ... if thou art a lover, and hast ever given one unmerited pang to that true heart which now lies cold and still beneath thy feet ; then be sure that every unkind look, every ungracious word, every ungentle action, will come thronging back upon thy memory, and knocking dolefully at thy soul...
Page 43 - Then weave thy chaplet of flowers and strew the beauties of Nature about the grave ; console thy broken spirit, if thou canst, with these tender yet futile tributes of regret ; but take warning by the bitterness of this thy contrite affliction over the dead, and henceforth be more faithful and affectionate in the discharge of thy duties to the living.
Page 24 - Disguise thyself as thou wilt, still slavery ! said I, still thou art a bitter draught; and though thousands in all ages have been made to drink of thee, thou art no less bitter on that account.
Page 125 - By his admirable contrivance, it has become a thing stupendous alike for its force and its flexibility, for the prodigious power which it can exert, and the ease, and precision, and ductility, with which it can be varied, distributed, and applied. The trunk of an elephant, that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it.
Page 125 - It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax before it draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.

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