Guide to the specimens of the horse family (Equidæ) exhibited in the Department of Zoology, British Museum (Natural History) ... (Google eBook)

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Printed by order of the Trustees, 1907 - Horses - 42 pages
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Page 35 - ... Prjevalsky's horse of Central Asia. Their coloration and the resulting protection is explained by Thayer's theory or law of the counteraction of light and shade. Pocock gives a good example. When the Asiatic kiang or the quagga of Cape Colony lies on the ground in the attitude characteristic of ungulates, the white on the back of the thighs is brought into line with that of the belly, and a continuous expanse of white, obliterating the shadow, extends all along the under side from the knee to...
Page 34 - ... conspicuously parti-colored animal into one which, even at a short distance, must have appeared to be an almost uniform brown, paling into cream on the under side, limbs and back of the haunches. A zebra, he says, has such a coloration as to render it invisible under three conditions, ie, at a distance in the open plain in midday, at close quarters in the dusk and on moonlit nights, and in the cover afforded by thickets.
Page 35 - ... quagga of Cape Colony lies on the ground in the attitude characteristic of ungulates, the white on the back of the thighs is brought into line with that of the belly, and a continuous expanse of white, obliterating the shadow, extends all along the under side from the knee to the root of the tail. " In correlation with the adoption of a life in the open, a new method of concealment by means of shadow counteraction was required, and was gradually perfected by the toning down of the stripes on...
Page 40 - There are two wild races of the species, namely the Nubian Wild Ass (Equus asinus africanus, M. 1014, fig. 26) inhabiting Northeastern Africa, that is to say Senaar and Nubia ; its range formerly extending as far as the fifth cataract of the Nile, and eastwards to the River Atbara and the Daaakil district, but not including Abyssinia.
Page 30 - The general colour is pale sandy fawn, with the tips of the ears, mane, dorsal stripe (which is continued down the tail) brown ; and there seems to be but little difference in this respect between the summer and winter coats. The dorsal stripe is narrow, as in the Kiang, and thus distinct from that of the Ghor-khar and Onager, which is broader and bordered with white.
Page 20 - Other distinctive features of the upper cheek-teeth are the absence of complex foldings in the enamel and the relatively large size (antero-posteriorly) of the anterior pillar (a), which is produced considerably in advance of the point of connection with the main body of the tooth, and is much flattened on the inner side. This feature is most pronounced in the premolars. The large relative size of the cheek-teeth is illustrated by comparison with those of a Dartmoor Pony skull (NH 27), Fio.
Page 28 - Another celebrated Thoroughbred stallion is " Ormonde," who was foaled in 1884, and died in 1904. Iked by the First Duke of Westminster, he was winner of the Derby, the St. Leger, and the Two Thousand Guineas in 1886, and was an unbeaten Horse. Ormonde is generally regarded as the best racer of the 19th century. The skull (NH 13) and part of the skeleton were presented by Mr. AB Macdonough in 1905. The pedigree of this stallion, to the fourth generation, is as follows : — Stockwell, 1849 15ond.0r,...
Page 31 - The upper-parts, in the summer coat, are usually some shade of pale reddish fawn or sandy (isabelline) ; while the light areas, which vary from pure white to whity brown, are much the same in extent as those of E. hemionus, but extend more on to the buttocks, and thence along the sides of the dorsal stripe, and in some cases occupy more of the body and head. In winter the long and rough coat becomes more or less decidedly grey, and in one race is distinctly mouse-grey with sharply defined white areas....
Page 6 - Although it is unnecessary to discuss the general structure of the Equida, it is important to mention that all members of the Horse tribe have a bare patch of hardened skin on the inner side of the fore-leg, situated some distance above the carpus, or

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