Martyr Age in the United States of America: An Article from the London and Westminster Review, for December, 1838 (Google eBook)

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Benedict, 1839 - Slavery - 36 pages
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Page 7 - I am aware that many object to the severity of my language; but is there not cause for severity? I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation.
Page 8 - It is pretended that I am retarding the cause of emancipation by the coarseness of my invective, and the precipitancy of my measures. The charge is not true. On this question, my influence, humble as it is, is felt at this moment to a considerable extent, and shall be felt in coming years— not perniciously, but beneficially— not as a curse, but as a blessing; and POSTERITY WILL BEAR TESTIMONY THAT I WAS RIGHT. I desire to thank God, that he enables me to disregard 'the fear of man which bringeth...
Page 8 - ... like the present. I am in earnest - I will not equivocate - I will not excuse - I will not retreat a single inch - AND I WILL BE HEARD. The apathy of the people is enough to make every statue leap from its pedestal, and to hasten the resurrection of the dead.
Page 21 - That it shall not be lawful for any deputy postmaster, in any State, Territory, or District, of the United States, knowingly to deliver to any person whatever, any pamphlet, newspaper, handbill, or other printed paper or pictorial representation touching the subject of slavery...
Page 26 - As thy day is, so shall thy strength be ;' and he has made his promise good. Pray for me. . . . We have a few excellent brethren here in Alton. They are sincerely desirous to know their duty in this crisis, and to do it; but as yet they cannot see that duty requires them to maintain their cause here at all hazards. Of this be assured, the cause of truth still lives in Illinois, and will not want defenders. Whether our paper starts again will depend on our friends...
Page 18 - No human institution, in my opinion, is more manifestly consistent with the will of God, than domestic slavery, and no one of His ordinances is written in more legible characters than that which consigns the African race to this condition, as more conducive to their own happiness, than any other of which they are susceptible.
Page 17 - I can hardly express to thee the deep and solemn interest with which I have viewed the violent proceedings of the last few weeks. Although I expected opposition, yet I was not prepared for it so soon — it took me by surprise, and I greatly feared Abolitionists would be driven back in the first onset, and thrown into confusion.
Page 24 - ... rights. The ground I take on this point is very plain. I wish to spare you, I wish to spare myself, the worthless and disgusting task of replying in detail to all the coarse attacks and flattering sophisms by which men have endeavored to entice or to drive women from this and from many other spheres of moral action. 'Go home and spin !' is the well-meaning advice of the domestic tyrant of the old school. 'Conquer by personal charms and fashionable attractions !' is the brilliant career marked...
Page 20 - ... giggling. The abolitionists, to whom this business was a prelude to life or death, were earnestly consulting in groups — at the further end of the chamber Garrison and another, standing head to head ; somewhat nearer, Dr Follen, looking German all over, and a deeper earnestness than usual overspreading his serene and meditative countenance ; and, in consultation with him, Mr Loring, looking only too frail in form, but with a face radiant with inward light.
Page 10 - ... which rests upon our national escutcheon, and to secure to the colored population of the United States all the rights and privileges which belong to them as men and as Americans, come what may to our persons, our interests, or our reputations, whether we live to witness the triumph of justice, liberty, and humanity, or perish untimely as martyrs in this great, benevolent, and holy cause.

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