Acceptance and Unveiling of the Statue of Daniel Webster in Washington on Jauary 18, 1900: Addresses (Google eBook)

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1900 - Washington (D.C.) - 34 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - He thinks the whole world sees it in his face, reads it in his eyes, and almost hears its workings in the very silence of his thoughts. It has become his master. It betrays his discretion, it breaks down his courage, it conquers his prudence. When suspicions from without begin to embarrass him, and the net of circumstance to entangle him, the fatal secret struggles with still greater violence to burst forth.
Page 24 - Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining, And thought of convincing, while they thought of dining; Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit: For a patriot, too cool; for a drudge, disobedient; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient.
Page 26 - It is accomplished. The deed is done. He retreats, retraces his steps to the window, passes out through it as he came in, and escapes. He has done the murder ; no eye has seen him, no ear has heard him. The secret is his own, and it is safe I Ah, gentlemen ! that was a dreadful mistake ! Such a secret can be safe nowhere.
Page 9 - I feel some little interest in this matter, Sir. Did not I commit myself in 1837 to the whole doctrine, fully, entirely? And I must be permitted to say that I cannot quite consent that more recent discoverers should claim the merit and take out a patent. "I deny the priority of their invention. Allow me to say, Sir, it is not their thunder...
Page 26 - ... every circumstance, connected with the time and place; a thousand ears catch every whisper ; a thousand excited minds intensely dwell on the scene, shedding all their light, and ready to kindle the slightest circumstance into a blaze of discovery. Meantime the guilty soul cannot keep its own secret. It is false to itself; or rather it feels an irresistible impulse of conscience to be true to itself.
Page 9 - We hear much just now of a panacea for the dangers and evils of slavery and slave annexation, which they call the 'Wilmot Proviso.' That certainly is a just sentiment, but it is not a sentiment to found any new party upon. It is not a sentiment on which Massachusetts Whigs differ. There is not a man in this hall who holds to it more firmly than I do, nor one who adheres to it more than another. "I feel some little interest in this matter, Sir. Did not I commit myself in 1837 to the whole doctrine,...
Page 26 - Ah! gentlemen, that was a dreadful mistake. Such a secret can be safe nowhere. The whole creation of God has neither nook nor corner where the guilty can bestow it, and say it is safe. Not to speak of that eye which...
Page 26 - Meantime, the guilty soul cannot keep its own secret. It is false to itself; or rather it feels an irresistible impulse of conscience to be true to itself : it labors under its guilty possession, and knows not what to do with it. The human heart was not made for the residence of such an inhabitant : it finds itself preyed on by a torment, which it dares not acknowledge to God or man.
Page 3 - States, and other officers of the United States; the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House, the Senators and Representatives in Congress, and the ambassadors and ministers from foreign countries.
Page 3 - That it will be more eligible, in the first instance, that a committee of three members from the Senate, and five members from the House of Representatives, to be appointed by the...

Bibliographic information