Of Mouse and Magic

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Hillcrest Publishing Group, Sep 1, 2011 - Juvenile Fiction - 269 pages
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Manny is the smallest of six mice born in his parents' nest in the woodpile. His mother worries that he might not make it. But life has much in store for him.

Manny dreams of being Zeus, Lord of Lightning, Titan of Thunder, with magical powers he can use to make life safe for all mice. But Manny is just an ordinary mouse.

Or is he?

Enter the woodpile near Farmer Frank's house and meet Manny and his family and friends. Manny's world is cozy and loving, but also filled with the dangers of farm cats, dogs with bad breath, foxes, and - worst of all - hawks, who can snatch you from your family in an instant. But as Manny discovers, friendships can come from unlikely places.

Follow Manny through danger, survival, love, and loss as his adventures and dreams take him far from his home, only to return to the warmth of family and friends (old and new). You, too, may believe in the tales "Of Mouse And Magic."

  

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
13
Section 3
19
Section 4
25
Section 5
35
Section 6
45
Section 7
56
Section 8
63
Section 16
115
Section 17
124
Section 18
135
Section 19
148
Section 20
157
Section 21
163
Section 22
172
Section 23
185

Section 9
69
Section 10
73
Section 11
81
Section 12
86
Section 13
92
Section 14
99
Section 15
110
Section 24
189
Section 25
202
Section 26
213
Section 27
228
Section 28
239
Section 29
254
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Allan began writing stories in high school and won a poetry competition judged by John Berryman in college. Under a Fulbright-Hays scholarship, he analyzed the socio/political, satirical works of Aziz Nesin, a Turkish writer widely read in the Middle East and in the Turkic Republics of the former Soviet Union, for his Ph.D. dissertation. He speaks Turkish and loves to travel in Turkey where he was a Peace Corps Volunteer and later worked for the Ford Foundation. While making a living in part by writing public documents without attribution, Allan practiced story-telling to his children and grandchildren. This is his first personal publication.

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