The Human Interface: New Directions for Designing Interactive Systems

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Addison-Wesley, 2000 - Computers - 233 pages
18 Reviews
This guide to interactive system design reflects the experience and vision of Jef Raskin, the creator of the Apple Macintosh project. Other books may show how to use today's widgets and interface ideas effectively. Raskin, however, demonstrates that many current interface paradigms are dead ends, and that to make computers significantly easier to use requires new approaches. He explains how to effect desperately needed changes, offering a wealth of innovative and specific interface ideas for software designers, developers, and product managers. The Apple Macintosh helped to introduce a previous revolution in computer interface design, drawing on the best available technology to establish many of the interface techniques and methods now universal in the computer industry. With this book, Raskin proves again both his farsightedness and his practicality. He also demonstrates how design ideas must be built on a scientific basis, presenting just enough cognitive psychology to link the interface of the future to the experimental evidence and to show why that interface will work.

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Review: The Humane Interface: New Directions for Designing Interactive Systems

User Review  - Brett - Goodreads

A welcome addition to my collection of ux bibles Read full review

Review: The Humane Interface: New Directions for Designing Interactive Systems

User Review  - Ninakix - Goodreads

a little out of date, but still interesting and applicable today. Read full review

Contents

two Cognetics and the Locus ofAttention
9
three Meanings Modes Monotony and Myths
33
four Quantification
71
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Jef Raskin (www.jefraskin.com) is a user interface and system design consultant based in Pacifica, California. Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Motorola, NCR, Xerox, Ricoh, Canon, McKesson, and AT&T all number among his clients along with dozens of less-well-known firms. His articles have been published in over forty periodicals including Wired, Quantum, IEEE Computer, and the Communications of the ACM. He is best known for having created the Macintosh at Apple and the Cat work processor for Canon.

0201379376AB04062001

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