The Mysterious Mother: A Tragedy (Google eBook)

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1791 - English drama - 92 pages
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Page 85 - I had heard, when very young, that a gentlewoman, under uncommon agonies of mind, had waited on archbishop Tillotson, and besought his counsel. A damsel that served her had, many years before, acquainted her that she was importuned by the gentlewoman's son to grant him a private meeting. The mother ordered the maiden to make the assignation, when, she said, she would discover herself, and reprimand him for his criminal...
Page 2 - They beg of heav'n the health of her son's soul And of her own : but often as returns The twentieth of September, they are bound Fast from the midnight watch to pray till morn. — More would he not disclose, or knew not more. — What precious mummery ! Her...
Page 86 - ... of the truth, he had fallen in love with, and actually married her. The wretched guilty mother learning what had happened, and...
Page 88 - I suppressed the story till the last scene; and bestowed every ornament of sense, unbigotted piety, and interesting contrition, on the character that was at last to raise universal indignation; in hopes that some degree of pity would linger in the...
Page 87 - I had, for a purpose to be mentioned hereafter, thrown it back to the eve of the Reformation ; and the queen, it appears, dates the event in the reign of Louis XII. I had chosen Narbonne for the scene; the queen places it in Languedoc. The rencontres are of little importance, and perhaps, curious to nobody but the author. In order to make...
Page 84 - ... passions, and in interesting the spectator. It was capable of furnishing, not only a contrast of characters, but a contrast of vice and virtue in the same character: and by laying the scene in what age and country I pleased, pictures of ancient manners might be drawn, and many allusions to historic events introduced to bring the action nearer to the imagination of the spectator. The moral resulting from the calamities attendant on unbounded passion, even to the destruction of the criminal person's...
Page 35 - On stocks and stones to frighten, not chastise us. Omens and prodigies are but begotten By guilt on pride. We know the doom we merit ; And self-importance makes us think all nature Busied to warn us when that doom approaches. Fie ! fie ! I blush to recollect my weakness. My Edmund may be dead : the house of Narbonne May perish...
Page 86 - I found a strange concurrence of circumstances between the story as there related, and as I had adapted it to my piece: for though I believed it to have happened in the reign of king William, I had, for a purpose mentioned below, thrown it back to the eve of the reformation; and the queen, it appears, dates the event in the reign of Louis XII.
Page 21 - Your thronged courts, the revelry, the tumult, That spoke the grandeur of my house, the homage Of neighb'ring barons ? Thus did Thibalt, Raoul, Or Clodomir, my brave progenitors, Creep like a spy, and watch to thrid your gates Unnotic'd? No; with martial attributes, With waving banners and enlivening fifes, They bade your portal wide unfold its jaws, And welcome them and triumph.
Page 88 - Countess may be supposed to have borrowed aid from other sources, besides those she found in her own understanding. Her character is certainly new, and the cast of the whole play unlike any other that I am acquainted with. The incidents seem to me to flow naturally from the situation; and with all the defects in the writing, of many of which I am conscious, and many more no doubt will be...

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