The History of Democracy: Or, Political Progress, Historically Illustrated, from the Earliest to the Latest Periods, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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American Publishing Company, 1875 - Great Britain - 677 pages
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Page 111 - Ireland, king, defender of the faith, &c., having undertaken for the glory of GOD, and advancement of the Christian faith, and honor of our king and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia, do, by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of GOD and of one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic...
Page 476 - Not like to like, but like in difference. Yet in the long years liker must they grow ; The man be more of woman, she of man ; He gain in sweetness and in moral height, Nor lose the wrestling thews that throw the world ; She mental breadth, nor fail in childward care, Nor lose the childlike in the larger mind; Till at the last she set herself to man, Like perfect music unto noble words...
Page 245 - For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good. and thou shalt have praise of the same: for he is a minister of God to thee for good.
Page 303 - By me kings reign, and princes decree justice. By me princes rule, and nobles, even all the judges of the earth.
Page 607 - I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; for kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour; who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
Page 286 - Brusa and Smyrna. Despotism itself is obliged to truck and huckster. The Sultan gets such obedience as he can. He governs with a loose rein, that he may govern at all; and the whole of the force and vigor of his authority in his centre is derived from a prudent relaxation in all his borders.
Page 130 - ... to the end that learning may not be buried in the graves of our forefathers in church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors.
Page 552 - The discretion of a judge is the law of tyrants : it is always unknown ; it is different in different men ; it is casual, and depends upon constitution, temper, and passion. In the best, it is oftentimes caprice ; in the worst it is every vice, folly, and passion, to which human nature is liable.'*- Lord Camden.
Page 286 - Then, Sir, from these six capital sources, of descent, of form of government, of religion in the northern provinces, of manners in the southern, of education, of the remoteness of situation from the first mover of government, from all these causes a fierce spirit of liberty has grown up.
Page 130 - It is therefore ordered, that every township in this jurisdiction, after the Lord hath increased them to the number of fifty householders, shall then forthwith appoint one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him to write and read...

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