Statistical survey of the county of Antrim (Google eBook)

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1812
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Page 81 - On examining this subterranean wonder, it was found to be a complete gallery, which had been driven forward many hundred yards to the bed of coal : that it branched off into numerous...
Page 51 - ... a perpendicular height of one hundred and seventy feet, from the base of which the promontory, covered over with rock and grass, slopes down to the sea, for the space of two hundred feet more: making, in all, a mass of near four hundred feet in height, which, in the beauty and variety of its colouring, in elegance and novelty of arrangement, and in the extraordinary magnificence of its objects, cannot be rivalled.
Page 484 - ... 1100. Where the Court-house and jail now stand, there was a noble house belonging to the Donegall family, built in 1610 upon the site of a Franciscan monastery, which, on the suppression of religious houses, was granted to Sir Edward Fitzgerald, who afterwards assigned it to Sir Arthur Chichester. The church is an ancient building in the form of a cross, dedicated to St. Nicholas ; in the north aisle is a monument of the Donegall family ; at the bottom is the figure of Sir Arthur Moyle, their...
Page 464 - Our soul is escaped even as a bird out of the snare of the fowler ; the snare is broken, and we are delivered.
Page 40 - The former of these, (BENGORE) lies about seven miles west of BALLYCASTLE, and is generally described by seamen, who see it at a distance, and in profile, as an extensive head•land, running out from the coast a considerable length into the sea; but, strictly speaking, it is made up of a number of lesser capes and bays, each with its own proper name, the tout ensemble of which forms what the seamen denominate the headland of BENGORE. " These capes are composed of...
Page 462 - ... did in revenge to the owner, whom they heard was landed the day before, and had been active in the service against them, and was shot that day, and also had his horse shot under him, but mounted presently upon another, and...
Page 484 - The building of the said castle on the south part is three towers, viz. the gate-house, tower in the middle thereof, which is the...
Page 75 - ... utility promises to become a profitable article to the owners. This species is also found on the east side of the same promontory, and is separated from the blazing coal by a whyn-dyke, at a place called Whaley's folly ; these two species are never found in contact, neither contiguous nor intermixed. The different fossils, commonly situated above the coal of this place, are ironstone, black shivery slate, grey, brown, or yellowish sandstone, and basalt, or whynstone ; the three former of these...
Page 459 - Lisnegarvy, and therefore resolved to attack it next morning, making little account of the opposition could be given them by so small a number, not half armed, and so slenderly provided of ammunition, (which they had perfect intelligence of by several Irish that left our party and stole away to them,) for that they were so numerous and well provided of ammunition by the fifty barrels of powder they found in his Majesty's store, in the castle of Newry, which they...
Page 484 - ... constables lodging; and in the courtain between the gate-house and west tower in the corner, being of divers squares called Cradyfergus, is a fair and comely building, a chapel, and divers houses of office...

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