Biographical sketch of Patrick Fraser Tytler (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1864
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - The wars between the houses of York and Lancaster in the fifteenth century. 5 . The union of the crowns of England and Scotland under James I. in 1604.
Page 2 - Inquiry, Historical and Critical, into the Evidence against Mary Queen of Scots, and an Examination of the Histories of Dr Robertson and Mr Hume with respect to that Evidence.
Page 12 - Review' for 1816, which I have always considered as one of 'the most attractive as well as characteristic of all his writings, had been originally conceived in the form of a portion of an introductory Essay to the contemplated historical work, which was now likely to go no further. He then proposed to your brother to enter on the undertaking ; and remarked to him that he knew his tastes and favourite pursuits lay so strongly in the line of history, and the history of his native country must have...
Page 12 - ... information, as well as advice in pursuing the necessary investigations. I asked my friend if the suggestion pleased him. He replied, that the undertaking appeared very formidable : that I knew he had always been fond of historical pursuits ; and though he confessed he had frequently cherished an ambition for becoming an historical author, yet it had never entered into his mind to attempt a history of his own country, as he knew too well the difficulties which he would have to encounter, especially...
Page 17 - It is with feelings of gratitude, mingled with regret, that the Author now closes this work the history of his country the labour of little less than eighteen years : gratitude to the Giver of all Good, that life and health have been spared to complete, however imperfectly, an arduous undertaking ; regret that the tranquil pleasures of historical investigation, the happy hours devoted to the pursuit of truth, are at an end, and that he must at last bid farewell to an old and dear companion.
Page 11 - Sir Walter stated that some years before, the booksellers had urged him to undertake such a work, and that he had at one time seriously contemplated it. The subject was very congenial to his tastes; and he thought that by interspersing the narrative with romantic anecdotes illustrative of the manners of his countrymen, he could render such a work popular. But he soon found, while engaged in preparing his materials, that something more was wanted than a popular romance ; that a right history of Scotland...
Page 5 - I now come to give you some idea of my studies. When I first went to England, from having always lived in a literary family, where Mr Black and papa were continually talking upon learned subjects, as well as having read a few books, I had picked up more general knowledge than is commonly to be found amongst the boys at an English school. This made me in some degree looked up to, and balanced my deficiency in classical knowledge. To this last I applied tooth and nail ; reading by myself, and often...
Page 5 - To me it seems the noblest of all studies. To say that it is entertaining is its least praise. It is the school of statesmen and warriors ; and the pleasure, next to living in the times, and being a witness to the actions of these, is that of reading their lives and actions.
Page 13 - ... conception of what a History of Scotland ought to be ; but that the suggestion coming from such a quarter, as well as the offered assistance, was not to be disregarded. You may be sure that I encouraged him to the best of my power ; for though I knew how much it was likely to withdraw his attention from his professional avocations, yet I also knew how much more congenial a pursuit it would prove, and how much more he was likely to attain to excellence, and establish his reputation in this channel....
Page 11 - Walter stated that some years before the booksellers had urged him to undertake such a work, and that he had at one time seriously contemplated it. The subject was very congenial to his tastes ; and he thought that by interspersing the narrative with romantic anecdotes illustrative of the manners of his countrymen, he could render such a work popular. But he soon found, while engaged in preparing his materials, that something more was wanted than a popular romance ; that a right history of Scotland...

Bibliographic information