A Sketch of the Life of Com. Robert F. Stockton: With an Appendix : Comprising His Correspondence with the Navy Department Respecting His Conquest of California : and Extracts from the Defence of Col. J.C. Fremont, in Relation to the Same Subject : Together with His Speeches in the Senate of the United States, and His Political Letters (Google eBook)

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Derby & Jackson, 1856 - California - 341 pages
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Page 93 - Jlnd be it resolved, That the governor be requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to the President of the United States, to Louis Kossuth, and to each of our senators and representatives in Congress.
Page 115 - Fremont and his surveying party, but who, unless driven out, will, with the aid of the hostile Indians, keep this beautiful country in a constant state of revolution and blood, as well as against all others who may be found in arms, or aiding or abetting Gen.
Page 152 - ... acquired bloodless possession of the Californias, and the American flag has been raised at every important point in that province. " I congratulate you on the success which has thus attended our military and naval operations. In less than seven months after Mexico commenced hostilities, at a time...
Page 7 - Fremont on the 12th instant, on his way here, who, not knowing what had occurred, he entered into the capitulation with them, which I now send to you ; and, although I refused to do it myself, still I have thought it best to approve it.
Page 92 - ... has ever been expended for the navy. Since that day, the navy has had no stain upon its escutcheon, but has been cherished as your pride and glory. And the American sailor has established a reputation throughout the world, in peace and in war, in storm and in battle, for heroism and prowess unsurpassed. He shrinks from no danger, he dreads no foe, and yields to no superior. No shoals are too dangerous, no seas too boisterous, no climate too rigorous for him. The burning sun of the tropics...
Page 151 - SIR: I have the honor to be in receipt of your favor of last night, in which I am directed to suspend the execution of orders which, in my capacity of military commandant of this territory, I had received from Commodore Stockton, governor and commnnder-in-chief in California.
Page 116 - ... and property. They invoke my protection. Therefore upon them I will not make war. I require, however, all officers, civil and military, and all other persons to remain quiet at their respective homes and stations, and to obey the orders they may receive from me or by my authority; and if they do no injury or violence to my authority, none will be done to them.
Page 120 - that if he marched upon the town he would find it the grave of his men." "Then," said he, "tell your general to have the bells ready to toll in the morning at eight o'clock, as I shall be there at that time...
Page 123 - I did hope that God who has watched over this republic who can do all things "who hung the Earth on nothing" who so endowed the mind of DANIEL WEBSTER would still longer have upheld its frail tenement, and kept him as an example to our own men, and to the men of the whole world. Indeed, it is no figure of speech, when we say that his fame was "world-wide.
Page 57 - The principle asserted is, that one legislature is competent to repeal any act which a former legislature was competent to pass; and that one legislature cannot abridge the powers of a succeeding legislature. The correctness of this principle, so far as respects general legislation, can never be controverted. But if an act be done under a law, a succeeding legislature cannot undo it. The past cannot be recalled by the most absolute power.

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