The housekeeper's manual of cookery and domestic economy (Google eBook)

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Page 65 - I have said, a tonic or strengthening property. Taken in moderate quantities, these ingredients of chicory are probably not injurious to health ; but by prolonged and frequent use they produce heartburn, cramp in the stomach, loss of appetite, acidity in the mouth, constipation, with intermittent diarrhoea, weakness of the limbs, tremblings, sleeplessness, a drunken cloudiness of the senses, &c. &c. At the best, therefore, chicory is a substitute for coffee to which only those to whom the price is...
Page 40 - Take six half-sieves of green walnut^shells, put them into a tub, mix them up well with common salt, from two to three pounds, let them stand for six days frequently beating and mashing them : by this time the shells become soft and pulpy, then by banking...
Page 40 - ... found. The quantity will be about six quarts. When done, let it be simmered in an iron boiler as long as any scum arises ; then bruise a quarter of a pound of ginger, a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of long pepper, two ounces of cloves...
Page 35 - Poultry, (ie heads, necks, gizzards, feet, &c.) and cover them with cold water, watch and stir it up well from the bottom, and the moment it begins to simmer, skim it carefully your Broth must be perfectly clear and limpid, on this depends the goodness of the Soups, Sauces, and Gravies, of which it is the basis...
Page 92 - EXCELLENT PORTABLE LEMONADE. Rasp with a quarter of a pound of sugar, the rind of a fine juicy lemon ; reduce the sugar to powder, and pour on it the strained juice of the fruit ; press the mixture into a jar, and when wanted for use dissolve a tablespoonful of it in a glass of water ; it will keep a considerable time. If too sweet for the taste of the drinker, a very small portion of citric acid may be added when it is taken.
Page 64 - In the old and infirm it serves also another purpose. In the life of most persons a period arrives when the stomach no longer digests enough of the ordinary elements of food, to make up for the natural daily waste of the bodily substance. The size and weight of the body, therefore, begin to diminish more or less perceptibly. At this period tea...
Page 64 - ... to enable the less energetic powers of digestion still to supply as much as is needed to repair the wear and tear of the solid tissues. No wonder, therefore, that tea should be a favourite on the one hand, with the poor, whose supplies of substantial food are scanty ; and on the other, with the aged and infirm, especially of the feebler sex, whose powers of digestion and whose bodily substance have together begun to fail.
Page 37 - ... divide them at the joints) ; lay them to soak in warm water, while you get ready the vegetables. Put into a gallon stew-pan eight cloves, two or three onions, half a drachm of allspice, and the same of black pepper, and the tails ;* cover them with cold water ; skim it carefully, when and as long as you see any scum rise ; then cover the pot as close as possible, and set it on the side of the fire to keep gently simmering till the meat becomes tender and will leave the bones easily, because it...
Page 51 - Two pounds of sifted flour, two pounds of sifted loaf sugar, two pounds of butter, eighteen eggs, four pounds of currants, one...
Page 67 - ... fevers, and inflammatory disorders, for which plenty of mild diluting liquor is one of the principal remedies; and if not suggested by the medical attendant, is frequently demanded by honest instinct, in terms too plain to be misunderstood. The stomach sympathizes with every fibre of the human frame, and no part of it can be distressed, without in some degree offending the stomach : therefore it is of the utmost importance to soothe this grand organ, by rendering...

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