Miscellanea Antiqua Anglicana: Or, A Select Collection of Curious Tracts, Illustrative of the History, Literature, Manners, and Biography, of the English Nation, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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T. Bensley and Son, Bolt Court, Fleet Street, 1816 - Christmas plays, English
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Page 155 - THE FAMOUS HISTORIE OF FRYER BACON, containing the wonderfull things that he did in his life : also the manner of his death, with the lives and deaths of the two conjurers, Bungye and Vandermast.
Page xi - History of the High and mighty Prince, Henry Prince of Purpoole, .Arch-Duke of Stapulia and Bernardia, Duke of High and Nether Holborn, Marquis of St. Giles and Tottenham, Count Palatine of Bloomsbury and Clerkenwell, Great Lord of the Cantons of Islington, Kentish-Town, Paddington, and Knights-bridge, Knight of the most Heroical Order of the Helmet, and Sovereign of the same ; Who Reigned and Died, AD 1594.
Page 13 - Conquests, and to make himselfe famous hereafter to all posterities : This (after great study) hee found could be no way so well done as one ; which was to make a head of Brasse, and if he could make this head to speake (and heare it when it speakes) then might hee be able to wall all England about with Brasse.
Page 13 - This (after great study) hee found could be no way so well done as one ; which was to make a head of brasse, and if he could make this head to speake (and heare it when it speakes) then might hee be able to wall all England about with brasse. To this purpose hee got one Fryer Bungey to assist him, who was a great scholler and a magician, (but not to bee compared to Fryer Bacon) these two with great study and paines so framed a head of brasse, that in the inward parts thereof there was all things...
Page 20 - Caesar from the sea coasts in France marke and observe the situation of the castles in England. Bodies may also be so framed that the greatest things shall appeare to be the least, the highest lowest, the most secret to bee the most manifest, and in such like sort the contrary. Thus did Socrates perceive, that the dragon which did destroy the citie and countrey adioyning, with his noisome breath, and contagious influence, did lurke in the...
Page 21 - why have you caused to do this wicked deed to me, considering that I took you from low estate, and made you my husband?" "I have good reason for me...
Page 4 - ... likely to prove a very great clerke : hereat old Bacon was not well pleased (for he desired to bring him up to plough and to the cart, as hee himselfe was brought)) yet he for reverence sake to the priest, shewed not his anger, but kindly thanked him for his paines and counsell, yet desired him not to speake any more concerning that matter ; for hee knew best what best pleased himselfe, and that he would doe : so broke they off their talke, and parted. So soone as the old man came home, he called...
Page 7 - So ill, .answered the gentleman, that I will be revenged of you. Threaten not (said Fryer Bacon) least I do you more shame, and doe you take heed how you give schollers the lye againe : but because I know not how well you are stored with money at this time, I will bear your wenches charges home : with that she vanished away...
Page 43 - Bacon for griefe^ did breake his rare Glasse, wherein he could see any thing that was done within fifty miles about him. IT is spoken of before now, that Fryer Bacon had a glasse, which was of that excellent nature, that any man might behold any thing that he desired to see within the compasse of fifty miles round about him : with this glasse he had pleasured divers kinds of people : for fathers did oftentimes desire to see (thereby) how their children did, and children how their parents did; one...
Page 35 - The old man seeing no remedy, but that hee must needes come forth, put a good face on it, and rose from under the bed : Behold my spirit (quoth Miles) that brought me all that you have had ; now bee as good as your word and swaddle him soundly. I protest...

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