An Examination of Mr. Pope's Essay on Man: Tr. from the French of M. Crousaz ... (Google eBook)

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A. Dodd, 1739 - 227 pages
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Page 97 - Planets and suns run lawless thro' the sky; Let ruling angels from their spheres be hurl'd, Being on being wreck'd, and world on world; Heav'n's whole foundations to their centre nod, And nature tremble to the throne of God.
Page 31 - Eye Nature's walks, shoot folly as it flies, And catch the manners living as they rise; Laugh where we must, be candid where we can; But vindicate the ways of God to man.
Page 105 - All are but parts of one stupendous whole, Whose body nature is, and God the soul; That, chang'd thro...
Page 9 - Say first, of God above, or man below, What can we reason, but from what we know ? Of man, what see we but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer ? Thro' worlds unnumber'd tho' the God be known, "Tis ours to trace him only in our own.
Page 94 - And little less than angel, would be more; Now looking downwards, just as griev'd appears To want the strength of bulls, the fur of bears.
Page 120 - As man, perhaps, the moment of his breath Receives the lurking principle of death; The young disease, that must subdue at length, Grows with his growth, and strengthens with his strength; So, cast and mingled with his very frame.
Page 74 - Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind: His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk or Milky Way: Yet simple Nature to his hope has given.
Page 67 - When the proud steed shall know why man restrains His fiery course, or drives him o'er the plains ; When the dull ox, why now he breaks the clod, Is now a victim, and now Egypt's god : Then shall man's pride and dulness comprehend His actions', passions', being's use and end ; Why doing, suffering, check'd, impell'd; and why This hour a slave, the next a deity.
Page 92 - Better for us, perhaps, it might appear, Were there all harmony, all virtue here; That never air or ocean felt the wind ; That never passion discomposed the mind. But all subsists by elemental strife; And passions are the elements of life. The general order, since the whole began, Is kept in nature, and is kept in man.
Page 211 - Pursues that chain which links th' immense design, Joins heaven and earth, and mortal and divine ; Sees that no being any bliss can know, But touches some above, and some below ; Learns from this union of the rising whole, The first, last purpose of the human soul ; And knows where faith, law, morals, all began, All end in love of God and love of man.

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