The Sprague Classic Readers, Book 4, Part 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
New York, 1903 - Readers
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

7
71
14
77
19
83

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - White are his shoulders and white his crest, Hear him call in his merry note: Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link, Spink, spank, spink; Look, what a nice new coat is mine, Sure there was never a bird so fine. Chee, chee, chee. Robert of Lincoln's Quaker wife, Pretty and quiet, with plain brown wings, Passing at home a patient life, Broods in the grass while her husband sings : Bob-o'-link, bob-o'-link, Spink, spank, spink. Brood, kind creature; you need not fear Thieves and robbers while I am here. Chee, chee,...
Page 177 - And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered, You heard as if an army muttered ; And the muttering grew to a grumbling ; And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling ; And out of the houses the rats came tumbling. Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats, Brown rats, black rats, gray rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, 33 Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives Followed the...
Page 172 - our Mayor's a noddy; And as for our Corporation - shocking To think we buy gowns lined with ermine For dolts that can't or won't determine What's best to rid us of our vermin! You hope, because you're old and obese, To find in the furry civic robe ease? Rouse up, Sirs! Give your brains a racking To find the remedy we're lacking, Or, sure as fate, we'll send you packing!
Page 124 - Humming-birds and honey-bees ; For my sport the squirrel played, Plied the snouted mole his spade ; For my taste, the blackberry cone Purpled over hedge and stone; Laughed the brook for my delight Through the day and through the night, Whispering at the garden wall, Talked with me from fall to fall...
Page 181 - The door in the mountain-side shut fast. Did I say, all? No! One was lame, And could not dance the whole of the way; And in after years, if you would blame His sadness, he was used to say, 'It's dull in our town since my playmates left!
Page 91 - O LITTLE town of Bethlehem, How still we see thee lie ! Above thy deep and dreamless sleep The silent stars go by : Yet in thy dark streets shineth The everlasting Light ; The hopes and fears of all the years Are met in thee to-night.
Page 174 - Come in!" the Mayor cried, looking bigger: And in did come the strangest figure! His queer long coat from heel to head Was half of yellow and half of red, And he himself was tall and thin, With sharp blue eyes, each like a pin, And light loose hair, yet swarthy skin No tuft on cheek, nor beard on chin, But lips where smiles went out and in; There was no guessing his kith and kin! And nobody could enough admire The tall man and his quaint attire. Quoth one: "It's as if my great-grandsire, Starting...
Page 179 - Once more he stept into the street And to his lips again Laid his long pipe of smooth straight cane; And ere he blew three notes (such sweet Soft notes as yet musician's cunning Never gave the enraptured air) There was a rustling that seemed like a bustling Of merry crowds justling at pitching and hustling, Small feet were pattering, wooden shoes clattering...
Page 180 - Out came the children running. All the little boys and girls, With rosy cheeks and flaxen curls, And sparkling eyes and teeth like pearls, Tripping and skipping, ran merrily after The wonderful music with shouting and laughter. The Mayor was dumb, and the Council stood As if they were changed into blocks of wood, Unable to move a step, or cry To the children merrily skipping by, Could only follow with the eye That joyous crowd at the Piper's back.
Page 155 - Are ye out of your mind, my nurse, my nurse?' Said Lady Clare, 'that ye speak so wild ?' 'As God's above,' said Alice the nurse, 'I speak the truth: you are my child. 'The old Earl's daughter died at my breast ; I speak the truth, as I live by bread! I buried her like my own sweet child, And put my child in her stead.' 'Falsely, falsely have ye done, 0 mother,' she said, 'if this be true, To keep the best man under the sun So many years from his due.

Bibliographic information