Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege: 1942-1943 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, May 1, 1999 - History - 560 pages
255 Reviews
Historians and reviewers worldwide have hailed Antony Beevor's magisterial Stalingrad as the definitive account of World War II's most harrowing battle. In August 1942, Hitler's huge Sixth Army reached the city that bore Stalin's name. In the five month siege that followed, the Russians fought to hold Stalingrad at any cost, then caught their Nazi enemy in an astonishing reversal. As never before, Stalingrad conveys the experience of soldiers on both sides as they fought in inhuman conditions, and of civilians trapped on an urban battlefield. Antony Beevor has interviewed survivors and discovered completely new material in a wide range of German and Soviet archives, including reports of prisoner interrogations, desertions, and executions. The battle of Stalingrad was the psychological turning point of World War II; as Beevor makes clear, it also changed the face of modern warfare. As a story of cruelty, courage, and human suffering, Stalingrad is unprecedented and unforgettable.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
131
4 stars
93
3 stars
29
2 stars
0
1 star
2

Brilliantly researched, and a great read. - Goodreads
The book is well written and easy to read. - Goodreads
Beevor is also an engaging writer. - Goodreads
Beevor is an excellent writer as well. - Goodreads

Review: Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege, 1942-1943

User Review  - Tamsin Barlow - Goodreads

If I were British I would say, "Bloody hell." Reading this book was like standing in front of a firehose of misery. For the true aficionado of war strategies and troop deployments you get more than ... Read full review

Review: Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege, 1942-1943

User Review  - Chuck - Goodreads

Antony Beevor's "Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege:1942-1943" tells the story of the Battle of Stalingrad, on of the great battles of World War 2. And a monumental battle it was. Over a million Soviets ... Read full review

Contents

WEHRMACHT
RED ARMY ON THE STALINGRAD AXIS
ARCHIVAL SOURCES
INTERVIEWS AND UNPUBLISHED ACCOUNTS
PREFACE
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER 16
CHAPTER 17
CHAPTER 18
CHAPTER 19
CHAPTER 20
CHAPTER 21

CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 12
CHAPTER 13

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Antony Beevor was educated at Winchester and Sandhurst, where he studied under John Keegan. A regular officer with the 11th Hussars, he left the Army to write. He has published four novels, and seven works of non-fiction. They include The Spanish Civil War; Inside the British Army; Crete—The Battle and the Resistance, which was awarded a Runciman Prize, and Paris After the Liberation, 1944-1949 (written with his wife Artemis Cooper). He has also been contributed to several books including The British Army, Manpower and Society into the Twenty-First Century, edited by Hew Strachan and to a forthcoming book on the Eastern Front in World War II in honour of the late John Erickson.

Stalingrad, first published in 1998, won the first Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson Prize for History and the Hawthornden Prize for Literature in 1999. The British edition, a number one bestseller in both hardback and paperback, has so far sold over 600,000 copies, and the book has been translated into twenty-four languages. The Fall of Berlin 1945, published in 2002, was accompanied by a BBC Timewatch programme on his research into the subject. The book will also be appearing in twenty-four foreign editions. It was a No. 1 Bestseller in seven countries apart from Britain, and in the top five in another nine countries. The two books between them have already sold over two million copies. His latest book, The Mystery of Olga Chekhova, describes the experiences of the Chekhov and Knipper families from before the Russian revolution until after the Second World War.

Antony Beevor was made a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French government in 1997 and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1999. He was the 2002-2003 Lees-Knowles lecturer at Cambridge. In 2003, he received the first Longman-History Today Trustees' Award. He is a member of the management committee of the Society of Authors and of the London Library. He is also Visiting Professor at the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College, University of London. In September 2003, he took over from Philip Pullman as Chairman of the Society of Authors. In July 2004, he received an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Letters from the University of Kent. He is currently a judge of the British Academy Book Prize and a member of the Samuel Johnson Prize steering committee.

Bibliographic information