The Water-mill: And Other Poems (Google eBook)

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Priv. print., 1870 - American poetry - 57 pages
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I own an original gold-leaf book of D. C. McCallum's "The Water-Mill and Other Poems" with the following inscription:
To John Tensfeld with compliments of D. C. McCallum.
Brooklyn , Dec. 1873
I am seeking to find
1. the value of the book
2. The relationship between the artist, John Tensfeld and D. C. McCallum
maxine@jerrya.net
 

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Page 6 - It may be glorious to write Thoughts that shall glad the two or three High souls, like those far stars that come in sight Once in a century ; — But better far it is to speak One simple word, which now and then Shall waken their free nature in the weak And friendless sons of men...
Page 10 - Oh ! the wasted hours of life, that have swiftly drifted by, Alas ! the good we might have done, all gone without a sigh ; Love that we might once have saved by a single kindly word, Thoughts conceived but ne'er expressed, perishing unpenned, unheard. Oh ! take the lesson to thy soul, forever clasp it fast, " The mill will never grind again with water that is past.
Page 9 - The summer winds revive no more leaves strewn o'er earth and main, The sickle never more will reap the yellow garnered grain ; The rippling stream flows ever on, aye, tranquil, deep and still, But never glideth back again to busy water-mill. The solemn proverb speaks to all, with meaning deep and vast, " The mill will never grind again with water that is past.
Page 10 - The solemn proverb speaks to all, with meaning deep and vast, " The mill will never grind again with water that is past." Oh ! clasp the proverb to thy soul, dear loving heart and true, For golden years are fleeting by, and youth is passing too ; Ah ! learn to make the most of life, nor lose one happy day, For time will ne'er return sweet joys neglected, thrown away ; Nor leave one tender word unsaid, thy kindness sow broadcast — " The mill will never grind again with water that is past.
Page 20 - See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight, So abject, mean, and vile, Who begs a brother of the earth To give him leave to toil ; And see his lordly fellow-worm The poor petition spurn, Unmindful tho' a weeping wife And helpless offspring mourn.
Page 9 - As on the field the reapers sing, while binding up the sheaves ! A solemn proverb strikes my mind, and as a spell is cast, " The mill will never grind again with water that is past.
Page 11 - The mill will never grind again with water that is past." Oh ! love thy God and fellow man, thyself consider last, For come it will when thou must scan dark errors of the past; Soon will this fight of life be o'er, and earth recede from view, And heaven in all its glory shine where all is pure and true. Ah ! then thou'lt see more clearly still the proverb deep and vast, " The mill will never grind again with water that is past.
Page 39 - Enriching thy coffers to wither thy heart, Take warning by thousands on yonder dark shore, Remember thy soul must exist evermore. Love good for good only, nor measure thy gain, Such motives are sordidly selfish and vain, Strewing blessings all round thee, with heart gushing o'er Flowing on to the ocean of love evermore. Religion is nothing, pretensions are vain, If works are still wanting, ah! where is thy gain ? As bark cast away on some desolate shore — As wreck on the deep thou art gone evermore....
Page 11 - Oh ! love thy God and fellow man, thyself consider last., For come it will when thou must scan, dark errors of the past, Soon will this fight of life be o'er, and earth recede from view, And Heaven in all its glory shine, where all is pure and true, Ah! then thou'lt see more clearly still, the proverb deep and vast, "The mill will never grind with water that is past.
Page 39 - BE KIND TO THE ERRING. Be kind to the erring, the humble, the meek, 'Tis coward alone who would trample the weak, Ye know not how deeply the past they deplore, In charity cover their sins evermore. Be kind to the erring, the lowly, the sad, Oft circumstance ruleth, whose chain driveth mad; Ah! boast not thy virtue, but con thy heart o'er. Communion with self crusheth pride evermore. Commune with thyself, think how reckless thou art, Enriching thy coffers to wither thy heart, Take warning by thousands...

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