The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers: From the Spectator

Front Cover
BiblioBazaar, 2008 - History - 276 pages
1 Review
1911. With introduction and notes by William Henry Hudson. Addison in association with Richard Steele perfected the essay as a literary form in their contributions to The Tatler and The Spectator. This volume is a collection of essays the two authors wrote for The Spectator. To give them a unifying principle Addison and Steele chose an imaginary club since clubs occupied such prominence in London social life. Their fictional, The Spectator Club, small and select as it is, was designed to be widely representative in its composition. Sir Roger de Coverley stands for the country gentry and Toryism; Sir Andrew Freeport for the commercial interest and Whiggism; the Templar, the Clergyman, and Captain Sentry, for the law, the church, and the army; and Will Honeycomb for fashion and society. In these essays, Addison and Steele describe with admirable humor and insight the daily scenes and happenings of contemporary life.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers from the Spectator

User Review  - Jess - Goodreads

I highly recommend this work as it is not only highly entertaining but the style in which it is written is very fine. It is a pleasure to read and I could suggest no finer example of English for the writer and speaker to emulate. Read full review

About the author (2008)

Addison, son of the Dean of Litchfield, took high honors at Oxford University and then joined the British army. He first came to literary fame by writing a poem, "The Campaign" (1704), to celebrate the Battle of Blenheim. When Richard Steele, whom he had known in his public school Charterhouse, started The Tatler in 1709, Addison became a regular contributor. But his contributions to a later venture The Spectator (generally considered the zenith of the periodical essay), were fundamental. While Steele can be credited with the editorial direction of the journal, Addison's essays, ranging from gently satiric to genuinely funny, secured the journal's success. In The Spectator, No. 10, Addison declared that the journal aimed "to enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality." His brilliant character of Sir Roger de Coverley (followed from rake to reformation) distinguishes the most popular essays. Addison died in 1719. He is buried in Westminster Abbey.

Bibliographic information