Making Stories: Law, Literature, Life

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 130 pages
5 Reviews

Stories pervade our daily lives, from human interest news items, to a business strategy described to a colleague, to daydreams between chores. Stories are what we use to make sense of the world. But how does this work?

In Making Stories, the eminent psychologist Jerome Bruner examines this pervasive human habit and suggests new and deeper ways to think about how we use stories to make sense of lives and the great moral and psychological problems that animate them. Looking at legal cases and autobiography as well as literature, Bruner warns us not to be seduced by overly tidy stories and shows how doubt and double meaning can lie beneath the most seemingly simple case.

  

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Review: Making Stories: Law, Literature, Life

User Review  - Rebekah - Goodreads

Some truly great insights on the use of narrative in society. His insights on narrative's role in law was especially insightful. Read full review

Review: Making Stories: Law, Literature, Life

User Review  - Linda Hayashi - Goodreads

I'm only on the first footnote and I am already grateful to be reading this. Read full review

Contents

THE USES OF STORY
3
THE LEGAL AND THE LITERARY
37
THE NARRATIVE CREATION OF SELF
63
SO WHY NARRATIVE?
89
NOTES
109
INDEX
125
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Jerome Bruner is University Professor at New York University and the author of many books, includingActs of Meaning;On Knowing;The Process of Education; andToward a Theory of Instruction(all published by Harvard).

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