"Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character (Google eBook)

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W. W. Norton & Company, Jun 28, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography
85 Reviews

A New York Times bestseller—the outrageous exploits of one of this century's greatest scientific minds and a legendary American original.

Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. Here he recounts in his inimitable voice his experience trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek; cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets; accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums; painting a naked female toreador. In short, here is Feynman's life in all its eccentric—a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah.
  

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I find it to be a great book; it really show how many scientists are quite quirky in real life. It is a great book, especially some of the comical things that happened in it. I'd recommend it to anyone that I know

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my favorite book--no joke, Mr. Feynman!

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Contents

III
15
V
25
VII
30
VIII
42
IX
45
X
53
XI
59
XII
66
XXVIII
180
XXX
184
XXXI
192
XXXIII
199
XXXIV
220
XXXV
221
XXXVI
232
XXXVII
237

XIII
69
XIV
77
XVI
81
XVII
84
XIX
88
XX
91
XXI
99
XXII
104
XXIII
107
XXIV
137
XXV
156
XXVI
165
XXVII
175
XXXVIII
247
XXXIX
256
XLI
258
XLIII
260
XLV
279
XLVI
288
XLIX
303
L
313
LII
318
LIII
330
LV
338
LVI
347
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About the author (2010)

Richard P. Feynman was born in 1918 and grew up in Far Rockaway, New York. At the age of seventeen he entered MIT and in 1939 went to Princeton, then to Los Alamos, where he joined in the effort to build the atomic bomb. Following World War II he joined the physics faculty at Cornell, then went on to Caltech in 1951, where he taught until his death in 1988. He shared the Nobel Prize for physics in 1965, and served with distinction on the Shuttle Commission in 1986. A commemorative stamp in his name was issued by the U.S. Postal Service in 2005.

Ralph Leighton, Richard Feynman's great friend and collaborator, now lives in northern California.

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