Names of dramas: A-L (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1812 - English drama
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Page 54 - We were all at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the Duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say, 'it will do it must do! I see it in the eyes of them!
Page 366 - ... fill the mind with a perpetual tumult of indignation, pity, and hope. There is no scene which does not contribute to the aggravation of the distress or conduct of the action, and scarce a line which does not conduce to the progress of the scene. So powerful is the current of the poet's imagination that the mind which once ventures within it is hurried irresistibly along.
Page 278 - The apparition left the regions of the dead to little purpose ; the revenge which he demands is not obtained, but by the death of him that was required to take it ; and the gratification, which would arise from the destruction of an usurper and a murderer, is abated by the untimely death of Ophelia, the young, the beautiful, the harmless, and the pious.
Page 18 - True,' representing some principal pieces of the reign of Henry VIII, which was set forth with many extraordinary circumstances of pomp and majesty, even to the matting of the stage; the Knights of the order with their Georges and Garter, the guards with their embroidered coats and the like: sufficient, in truth, within a while, to make greatness very familiar, if not ridiculous.
Page 217 - Statutes in that case made and provided, and against the peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, his crown, and dignity.
Page 88 - Cato it has been not unjustly determined, that it is rather a poem in dialogue than a drama, rather a succession of just sentiments in elegant language, than a representation of natural affections, or of any state probable or possible in human life. Nothing here excites or asswages emotion; here is no magical power of raising phantastick terror or wild anxiety.
Page 347 - The Troublesome Raigne of John, King of England, with the Discoverie of King Richard Cordelion's base Son, vulgarly named the Bastard Fawconbridge : also the Death of King John at Swinstead Abbey.
Page 303 - Falling in the other day at a victualling-house near the house of peers, I heard the maid come down and tell the landlady at the bar, that my lord bishop swore he would throw her out at window, if she did not bring up more mild beer, and that my lord duke would have a double mug of purl.
Page 278 - ... the natural sentiments of man. New characters appear from time to time in continual succession, exhibiting various forms of life and particular modes of conversation. The pretended madness of Hamlet causes much mirth, the mournful distraction of Ophelia fills the heart with tenderness, and every personage produces the effect intended, from the apparition that in the first act chills the blood with horror, to the fop in the last, that exposes affectation to just contempt.
Page 140 - Security wherein was personated a King or some great Prince with his Courtiers of...