L÷wenstein, king of the forests (Google eBook)

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Page 1 - Although thy breath be rude. Heigh, ho ! sing, heigh, ho ! unto the green holly : Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly Then, heigh, ho, the holly ! This life is most jolly. Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, That dost not bite so nigh As benefits forgot : Though thou the waters warp, Thy sting is not so sharp As friend remember'd not Heigh, ho ! sing, heigh, ho ! &c.
Page 159 - Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win, By fearing to attempt.
Page 76 - SAY not thou art all alone Upon this wide, cold-hearted earth ; Sigh not o'er joys for ever flown, Ś The vacant chair, the silent hearth : Why should the world's unholy mirth Upon thy quiet dreams intrude, To scare those shapes of heavenly birth That people oft thy solitude ? Though many a fervent hope of youth Hath passed, and scarcely left a trace ; Though earth-born love, its tears and truth, No longer in thy heart have place ; Nor time, nor grief can e'er efface The brighter hopes that now...
Page 245 - I saw her in childhood Ś A bright, gentle thing, Like the dawn of the morn, Or the dews of the spring : The daisies and hare-bells Her playmates all day ; Herself as light-hearted And artless as they. I saw her again Ś A fair girl of eighteen, Fresh glittering with graces Of mind and of mien. Her speech was all music ; Like moonlight she shone ; The envy of many, The glory of one. Years, years fleeted over Ś I stood at her foot : The bud had grown blossom, The blossom was fruit. A dignified...
Page 245 - AGNES I saw her in childhood Ś A bright, gentle thing, Like the dawn of the morn, Or the dews of the spring : The daisies and hare-bells Her playmates all day ; Herself as light-hearted And artless as they. I saw her again Ś A fair girl of eighteen, Fresh glittering with graces Of mind and of mien. Her speech was all music ; Like moonlight she shone ; The envy of many, The glory of...
Page 289 - ... of intellectual improvement. It is the power of attention which in a great measure distinguishes the wise and the great from the vulgar and trifling herd of men. The latter are accustomed to think, or rather to dream without knowing the subject of their thoughts. In their unconnected rovings, they pursue no end ; they follow no track. Every...
Page 179 - He lived in court, Which rare it is to do, most praised, most loved ; A sample to the youngest ; to the more mature, A glass that featured them ; and to the graver, A child that guided dotards.
Page 76 - OH! say not thou art all alone Upon this wide, cold-hearted earth. Sigh not o'er joys forever flown Ś The vacant chair, the silent hearth. Why should the world's unholy mirth Upon thy quiet dreams intrude, To scare those shapes of heavenly birth That people oft thy solitude? Though many a fervent hope of youth Hath passed and scarcely left a trace; Though earth-born love its tears...
Page 54 - ... weep and wake, And thou to slumber gone. I little thought it thus could be In days more sad and fairŚ That earth could have a place for me, And thou no longer there. Yet death cannot our hearts divide, Or make thee less my own : 'Twere sweeter sleeping at thy side Than watching here alone. Yet never, never can we part, While Memory holds her reign : Thine, thine is still this wither'd heart, Till we shall meet again.
Page 229 - I wish you would just forget what difference there is between us," said the young midshipman, kindly ; " and please to remember, that if it had not been for you, I should not have had a mouth to eat with, or a tongue to thank you with either. Besides, ' being on equal terms' now, you know; Ś ah! you haven't forgotten our talk on the rocks of Gibraltar, I see.

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