All the King's Men (Google eBook)

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A&C Black, Nov 7, 2012 - History - 320 pages
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First published in 1988, this is the story of how Claude Dansey, deputy head of MI6, infiltrated Henri Déricourt, double agent extraordinaire, into the rival British wartime secret service, SOE. The ensuing trail of destruction and betrayal led to the loss of over four hundred British and French agents.

Recruited as the man SOE so desperately needed, Déricourt penetrated the heart of PROSPER, SOE's biggest network in France. At the same time he renewed contact with Karl Boemelburg, head of German counter-espionage in Paris. Every movement, code and dispatch from the British agents was made known to Boemelburg; Déricourt gave him everything. His treachery finally led to the disastrous fall of the PROSPER network, and to the arrest of nearly one thousand men and women, hundreds of whom died in concentration camps.

Was it patriotism that drove Dansey, or was the Déricourt plan merely part of the secret war between MI6 and SOE, a war in which Dansey held all the weapons? All the King's Men is the dramatic account on one of the most ruthless secret operations of the Second World War.
  

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Contents

Preface
The French Kid Glove
The Hand of Albion
Ill The Fall
Organization
To England
Prosper
The Trojan Horse
Xll In the Wilderness
Consequences
Cockade
Denunciation
Arrangements
Trials
Afterwards
Bibliography

The Rules of the Game
An Eastern Influence
Down to Business
The Other Game
References in the Text
Footnotes
A Note on the Author

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About the author (2012)

Robert Marshall divided his career between writing books and plays. He also produced arts and history programming initially for the BBC and, later, live recordings of great theatre productions for cinema release, with more than 100 credits to his name.

His writing career began with a series of radio plays, and a Play for Today 'Before Water Lilies' for the BBC in the 1970s. During the 1980s and 90s he scripted and directed over thirty programmes for the BBC, from documentaries to dramas including All the King's Men (1988) which was optioned by Stanley Kubrick, In the Sewers of Lvov (1990) which was made into the feature film In Darkness, and Storm From the East (BBC 1994) which was top of the Times non-fiction best-selling list for over two months. He became Executive Producer for The Globe on Screen, at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre.

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