The Crooked and Narrow Streets of the Town of Boston, 1630-1822 (Google eBook)

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Marshall Jones Company, 1920 - Streets - 282 pages
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Page 120 - At the same general court there fell out a great business upon a very small occasion. Anno 1636, there was a stray sow in Boston, which was brought to Captain Keayne: he had it cried divers times, and divers came to see it, but none made claim to it for near a year. He kept it in his yard with a sow of his own. Afterwards one Sherman's wife, having lost such a sow, laid claim to it, but came not to see it, till Captain Keayne had killed his own sow.
Page 109 - Dined at Mr. Nick Boylston's, with the two Mr. Boylstons, two Mr. Smiths, Mr. Hallowell, and their ladies an elegant dinner indeed ! Went over the house to view the furniture, which alone cost a thousand pounds sterling. A seat it is for a nobleman, a prince. The Turkey carpets, the painted hangings, the marble tables, the rich beds with crimson damask curtains and counterpanes, the beautiful chimney clock, the spacious garden, are the most magnificent of any thing I have ever seen.
Page 244 - Us all very well for the children to hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere; But why should my name be quite forgot, Who rode as boldly and well, God wot? Why should I ask? The reason is clear My name was Dawes and his Revere. When the lights from the old North Church flashed out, Paul Revere was waiting about, But I was already on my way. The shadows of night fell cold and gray As I rode, with never a break or pause; But what was the use, when my name was Dawes?
Page 53 - In the fall of 1774 and winter of 1775, I was one of upwards of thirty, chiefly mechanics, who formed ourselves into a committee for the purpose of watching the movements of the British soldiers. and gaining every intelligence of the movements of the Tories. We held our meetings at the Green Dragon tavern.
Page 156 - Two great orators and statesmen, belonging to two different generations, repeatedly put forth all their powers in defence of the bill. The House of Commons heard Pitt for the last time, and Burke for the first time, and was in doubt to which of them the palm of eloquence should be assigned. It was indeed a splendid sunset and a splendid dawn.
Page 1 - Wilson, and the greatest part of the church removed thither : whither also the frame of the Governor's house, in preparation at this town, was also (to the discontent of some) carried; where people began to build their houses against winter; and this place was called BOSTON.
Page 15 - A godly woman of the church of Boston, dwelling sometimes in London, brought with her a parcel of very fine linen of great value, which she set her heart too much upon...
Page 107 - I have been young and now am old, and I solemnly say, I have never known a man, whose love of his country was more ardent or sincere, never one, who suffered so much, never one, whose services for any ten years of his life were so important and essential to the cause of his country, as those of Mr Otis from 1760 to 1770.
Page 225 - Blackstons point on part whereof his then dwelling house stood ; after which purchase the Town laid out a place for a trayning field ; which ever since and now is used for that purpose, and for the feeding of cattell : Robert Walker, and William Lythertand farther Testify that Mr.
Page 193 - Adams is zealous, ardent, and keen in the cause, is always for softness, and delicacy, and prudence, where they will do, but is staunch and stiff and strict and rigid and inflexible in the cause.

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