Doing Business with the Dictators: A Political History of United Fruit in Guatemala, 1899-1944

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1993 - Business & Economics - 256 pages
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The United Fruit Company (UFCO) developed an unprecedented relationship with Guatemala in the first half of this century. By 1944, UFCO owned 566,000 acres, employed 20,000 people, and operated 96% of Guatemala's 719 miles of railroad, making the multinational corporation Guatemala's largest private landowner and biggest employer. In Doing Business with the Dictators, Paul J. Dosal shows how UFCO built up a profitable corporation in a country whose political system was known to be corrupt. His work is based largely on research of company documents recently acquired from the Justice Department under the Freedom of Information Act-no other historian researching this topic has looked at these sources. As a result, Dr. Dosal is able to offer the first documentary evidence of how UFCO acquired, defended, and exploited its Guatemalan properties by collaborating with successive authoritarian regimes.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Liberals Lay the Foundations
17
An Empire Is Born
37
Minor Keith and Caudillo Politics
55
United Fruit Cuyamel and the Battle for Motagua Part I
75
The Democratic Interlude
95
The Puerto Barrios Strike
119
The Battle for Motagua Part 11
141
Expansion to the Pacific
161
The Octopus
183
The United States versus United Fruit
205
Epilogue
225
Bibliography
233
Index
249
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Paul J. Dosal is assistant professor of Latin American history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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