Handbook of organic chemistry: for the use of students (Google eBook)

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A. S. Barnes & co., 1857 - Chemistry, Inorganic - 426 pages
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Page 183 - Solution of sulphate of potash was placed in contact with the negatively electrified point, pure water was placed in contact with the positively electrified point, and a weak solution of ammonia was made the middle link of the conducting chain ; so that no sulphuric acid could pass to the positive point in the distilled water, without passing through the solution of ammonia. The...
Page 55 - Pass the prepared side of the paper taken from the camera rapidly over this mixture, taking care to insure complete contact" in every part. If the paper has been sufficiently impressed, the picture will almost immediately appear, and the further action of the iron must be stopped by the application of a soft sponge and plenty of clear water.
Page 55 - ... water, Should the image not appear immediately, or be imperfect in its details, the iron solution may be allowed to remain upon it a short time ; but it must then be kept disturbed, by rapidly but lightly brushing it up, otherwise numerous black specks will form and destroy the photograph. Great care should be taken that the iron solution does not touch the back of the picture, which it will inevitably stain, and, the picture being a negative one, be rendered useless as a copy. A slight degree...
Page 54 - ... ounce of water. To three parts of this add two of acetic acid. Then if the prepared plate is rapidly dipped once or twice into this solution it acquires a very great degree of sensibility, and it ought then to be placed in the camera without much delay. 8. The plate is withdrawn from the camera, and in order to bring out the image it is dipped into a solution of protosulphate of iron, containing one part of the saturated solution diluted with two or three parts of water. The image appears very...
Page 187 - ... side, so that the metal would be on the convex surface of the ends of the electrodes. By this means, we insure that when the electrode has been passed along the urethra, the metal phalanges shall come in contact with the prostatic bar or obstructing hypertrophical part of the prostate. The electrode is connected with the negative pole of the battery, the positive pole being placed on some indifferent part of the body. The circuit is then closed and a weak current of 5 milliamperes is employed....
Page 24 - Now it is a curious fact, that if we cause the two polarised beams 0 o, E e to be united into one, or if we produce them by a thin plate of Iceland spar, which is not capable of separating them, we obtain a beam which has exactly the same properties as the beam abcd of common light.
Page 53 - Talbot thus directs that it should be prepared. 1. Take the most liquid portion of the white of an egg, rejecting the rest. Mix it with an equal quantity of water. Spread it very evenly upon a plate of glass, and dry it at the fire. A strong heat may be used without injuring the plate. The film of dried albumen ought to be uniform and nearly invisible. 2. To an aqueous solution of nitrate of silver add a considerable quantity of alcohol, so that an ounce of the mixture may contain three grains of...
Page 191 - I cannot,' he says, at the end of his first paper on magne-crystallic action, ' conclude this series of researches without remarking how rapidly the knowledge of molecular forces grows upon us, and how strikingly every investigation tends to develop more and more their importance, and their extreme attraction as an object of study. A few years ago magnetism was to us an occult power, affecting only a few bodies, now it is found to influence all bodies, and to possess the most intimate relations with...
Page 24 - ... left, or on any other side of it, provided that in all these cases it falls upon the surface in the same manner; or, what amounts to the same thing, the beam of solar light has the same properties on all its sides ; and this is true, whether it is white light as directly emitted from the sun, or whether it is red light, or light of any other color.
Page 58 - A saturated solution of any hydriodic salt is made to dissolve as much iodine as possible, and of this liquid two drachms are mingled with four ounces of water. Care is required that one side only of the paper is wetted, which is by no means difficult to effect, the fluid is so greedily absorbed by it ; all that is necessary being a broad shallow vessel to allow of the paper touching the fluid to its full width, and that it be drawn over it with a slow steady movement. When thus wetted, it is to...

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