Florentine tales: with modern illustrations [by T.Powell and J.H.L. Hunt]. (Google eBook)

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1847
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Page 308 - ... Garbed with death's angelic grace ; Sweetly fell the fresh-born day On the calmness of that clay : Looking on it, one might deem She was smiling in a dream. Clara paused an instant there, Gazing on that brow so fair ; Crossed herself, and sighing said, (As she turned aside her head,) " Little can we tell who share Our household hearth of joy and care ! " Therefore with grave tenderness Should we strive to cheer and bless " All who live this little life, Husband, children, sire, or wife, "...
Page 95 - Afterward, when she was better recovered, she affirmed that she neither remembered how the fetters were knocked off, how she went out of the prison, when she was turned off the ladder, whether any psalm was sung or not, nor was she sensible of any pains that she could remember...
Page 7 - By Heavens ! it must be a pleasant thing To live and die within a garden land, To see the bursting herbage in the spring, And watch as day by day the buds expand ! To hear the sweet birds in the morning sing, Those songs which the pure heart can understand ! To sit at noon beneath the leafy tree, Whose rustling makes a music like the sea.
Page 10 - And then to watch the twilight shadows creep Over the mighty heavens, like a thought Glooming the mind ; to know the world asleep And nature to the breast of midnight caught ! To feel the silence passionately deep, 'Till every sense is to its climax wrought! For one sweet year of life like this, I'd give In glad exchange the years I have to live.
Page 91 - The author here, perhaps, may appear too hard on the sex, as if he were inclined to insinuate the impossibility of finding any virtue in it. In disproof of this, however, take the following from an old book of paradoxes, which, as it has neither date nor title-page, I cannot more particularly describe. " I am not so courageous, that I dare defend women, or pronounce them good ; yet we see physicians allow some virtue in every poison : Then why should we except women ? Since certainly they are good...
Page 40 - tis the jealous ghost, condemned to roam Abroad, as penance for his sins at home. xv. Some said they heard the clanking of his chains, And others that he had no chains at all ; Some that he roared aloud with hellish pains, While others said he let no murmur fall. One lady, blest with rare poetic brains, Distinctly...
Page 140 - tis sweet To look on Florence ! How the heart doth beat In the touched bosom of Girolamo ! Val d'Arno ! never yet did he so greet Thee and the city there that sleeps below, Within thine arms embraced, and coloured in the glow XXIII. Of an Italian sunset. There, behold, Gorgeously tinted, the Duomo loom ; The Campanile, in a mist of gold, And the tall tower of...
Page 112 - All this of course had been contrived before, That furtively, as you may understand, He might quit Florence, and, being put on shore At Pisa, thence by Genoa, overland, Reach France and Paris. By which underhand Proceeding, poor Salvestra nothing knew Of his departure, even though from the strand She watched, with mystic sense, as it withdrew, The stately barque that held her lover young and true ! XXVIII. Salvestra looks at the receding sail With ignorant complacence ; yet, I've hinted, A mystic...
Page 16 - Therefore, good Father, give me your advice How I may cure my spouse, this sottish swine, Of jealousy, that inconvenient vice; It leads away my soul from thoughts divine, So that I quite despair of Paradise ; Whereas I'm sure, if wedded peace were mine, I should all wives in piety eclipse, And nought save Watts' hymns should pass my lips . '
Page 94 - ... all things there glittered like silver and gold) he caused all to depart the room but the gentlemen of the faculty who were to have been at the dissection, and asked her concerning her sense and apprehensions during the time she was hanged. To which she answered at first somewhat impertinently, talking as if she had been then to suffer. And when they spake unto her concerning her miraculous deliverance, she answered that she hoped God would give her patience, and the like : afterwards, when she...

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