Complete Report on Construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct: With Introductory Historical Sketch; Illustrated with Maps, Drawings and Photographs ... (Google eBook)

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Department of Public Service, 1916 - Aqueducts - 319 pages
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Page 71 - ... putting the water in Los Angeles) comes from certain private power companies whose object evidently is for their own pecuniary interest to prevent the municipality from furnishing its own water. The people at the head of these power companies are doubtless respectable citizens, and if there is no law they have the right to seek their own pecuniary advantage in securing the control of this necessary of life for the city. Nevertheless, their opposition seems to me to afford one of the strongest...
Page 71 - prohibited from ever selling or letting to any corporation or individual, except a municipality or a municipal water district or irrigation district, the right to sell or sublet the water or the electric energy sold or given to it or him
Page 71 - Under the circumstances, I decide, in accordance with the recommendations of the Director of the Geological Survey and the Chief of the Forestry Service, that the bill be approved, with the prohibition against the use of the water by municipality for irrigation struck out. I request, however, that there be put in the bill a prohibition against the City of Los Angeles ever selling or letting to any corporation or individual except a municipality, the right for that corporation or the individual itself...
Page 63 - Our examination of the streams in the Owens Valley showed that the creeks coming from the Sierras furnished water which is clear, colorless, and attractive; the water in the river, being made up of the combined flow of these creeks, is of similar character, but has a slight turbidity and stain, owing apparently to drainage from the marshes in Long Valley and to other return water from the canals and irrigated lands. This feature would make the water somewhat objectionable if it were to flow directly...
Page 68 - I am also impressed by the fact that the chief opposition to this bill, aside from the opposition of the few settlers in Owens Valley (whose interest is genuine, but whose interest must unfortunately be disregarded in view of the infinitely greater interest to be served by putting the water in Los Angeles...
Page 9 - Reprinted from the Journal of the New England Water Works Association, Dec., 1913. WATER SUPPLY Los Angeles. Department of Public Service. Complete report on construction of the Los Angeles aqueduct, with introductory historical sketch. 1916. 319 p., diagr., map. illus. 352.712L7c "The construction of the aqueduct that brings the waters of Owens River across 250 miles of desolate and rugged country to the City of Los Angeles set a new standard of public service for American municipalities. No other...
Page 47 - ... deliver the water rights without cost to the City. The Board of Water Commissioners, as well as other city officials, declined this, and insisted upon an exclusive municipal ownership and control. At this time, the US Reclamation Service was investigating the Owens Valley Project, and had withdrawn all public lands there, including reservoir sites, and had filed on the water. Mr. Eaton's program was presented to the officials of the Reclamation Service, including Mr. FH Newell, chief engineer,...
Page 17 - ... the city. Also, they joined with a committee from the Chamber of Commerce in presenting the matter to President Roosevelt and securing his approval of a bill confirming the city's right to use such public land as it might require. A special right of way act was passed by Congress in June, 1906, granting free right of use to the city of Los Angeles of all public lands required for canals, reservoirs and power plants in Inyo, Kern and Los Angeles...
Page 315 - ... crystallized with respect to the requirements which the supply and works must fulfill. These requirements are sanitary, aesthetic, commercial and protective in their nature. They may be summarized as follows: (a) Quality. (1) Primarily the water supply must be free from pathogenic or disease producing organisms. More than this, it should be free from those allied organic forms which may not as yet be recognized as accompanying disease, but which may nevertheless not be conducive to health. This...
Page 17 - ... period, to say nothing of the flow of the water for many miles in Owens River above the proposed point of diversion. The consulting engineers say of this project: We find the project admirable in conception and outline, and full of promise for the continued prosperity of the city of Los Angeles.

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