Sherman and his campaigns: a military biography (Google eBook)

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C.B. Richardson, 1865 - United States - 512 pages
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Page 269 - Negroes who are able-bodied and can be of service to the several columns, may be taken along; but each army commander will bear in mind that the question of supplies is a very important one, and that his first duty is to see to those who bear arms. " 8. The organization at once of a good pioneer battalion for each corps, composed, if possible, of negroes, should be attended to.
Page 397 - The Confederate armies now in existence to be disbanded and conducted to their several State capitals, there to deposit their arms and public property in the State Arsenal; and each officer and man to execute and file an agreement to cease from acts of war, and to abide the action of the State and Federal authority.
Page 326 - They can at any moment have peace simply by laying down their arms and submitting to -the national authority under the Constitution.
Page 301 - ... great success. Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate military advantages ; but in showing to the world that your army could be divided, putting the stronger part to an important new service, and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of the whole, Hood's army, it brings those who sat in darkness to see a great light. But what next ? I suppose it will be safe if I leave General Grant and yourself to decide. Please make my grateful acknowledgments to your whole...
Page 226 - GENTLEMEN : I have your letter of the llth, in the nature of a petition to revoke my orders removing all the inhabitants from Atlanta. I have read it carefully, and give full credit to your statements of the distress that will be occasioned by it, and yet shall not revoke my orders, simply because my orders are not designed to meet the humanities of the case...
Page 506 - I admit my folly in embracing in a military convention any civil matters; but, unfortunately, such is the nature of our situation that they seem inextricably united, and I understood from you at Savannah that the financial state of the country demanded military success, and would warrant a little bending to policy.
Page 301 - When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful; but feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering that "nothing risked, nothing gained," I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went further than to acquiesce.
Page 146 - I desire to express to you and your command my most hearty thanks and gratitude for your promptness in coming to our relief during the siege of Knoxville, and I am satisfied your approach served to raise the siege. The emergency having passed, I do not deem, for the present, any other portion of your command but the corps of General Granger necessary for operations in this section; and, inasmuch as General Grant has weakened the forces immediately with him in order...
Page 344 - ... but to spare all dwellings, colleges, schools, asylums, and harmless private property. I was the first to cross the pontoon bridge, and in company with General Howard rode into the city. The day was clear, but a perfect tempest of wind was raging. The brigade of Colonel Stone was already in the city, and was properly posted. Citizens and soldiers were on the streets, and general good order prevailed.
Page 58 - Tennessee the presumptuous mercenaries collected for our subjugation ? One more manly effort, and trusting in God and the justness of our cause, we shall recover more than we lately lost.

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