Mental and moral science: a compendium of psychology and ethics (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, 1868 - Ethics - 850 pages
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Contents

The dead strain or action without movement Systematic
18
the stimulus of riding
24
Acute Diseases of the nerveB nervous Fatigue Healthy nerves
30
The Language of the Feelings has to be acquired
37
BENSB OF SMELL
39
Plurality of PointsWebers experi
45
SENSE OF HEARING
51
Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
60
THE APPETITES
67
Muscles of the Body generally
73
Law of Selfconservation
79
Successions of Movements
87
Intervention of Sensations in trains of Movement ib 7 Conditions governing the rate of Acquisition generally ib 8 Circumstances favouring the adhes...
88
All acquirements suppose Physical Vigour
89
Association of Ideas of Movement ib 11 The seat of Ideas the same as of Sensations or Actualities ib 12 The tendency of Ideas to become Actualities ...
90
The principle applied to explain Sympathy
91
Points common to the Idea and to the Actuality
92
In all the senses different sensations are associated together
93
Separate ideas become selfsustaining by repetition ib 20 Association of Sensations of Touch
94
Law of the Rate of Acquirement in Touch ib 22 The acquirements of Touch most numerous in the blind
95
Forms and Coloured surfaces
97
SENSATIONS OF DIFFERENT SEN8ES 25 Movements with Sensations Muscular Ideas with Sensations Architecture Sensations with Sensations
98
CHAP VI
99
Law of the Rate of such acquirements
100
Localization of the Bodily Feelings
101
Our body is an object fact with subject associations
102
Pleasure and Pain can persist and be reproduced ideally to 31 Law of the association
103
The Special Emotions converted into Affections
104
Ritual ib 34 The interest of Ends transferred to the Means Money Formali ties Truth
105
Influence of association in Fine Art Alisons Theory
106
ASSOCIATIONS OF VOLITION 40 Contiguous association of actions and states of feeling
109
Our ideas of external nature are associations of sensible qualities it 42 The Naturalist mind represents disinterested association
110
Association of things habitually conjoined in our view it 45 Maps Diagrams and Pictorial Representations Ill SUCCESSIONS
111
MECHANICAL ACQUISITIONS 47 Summary of conditions of Mechanical Acquirement
114
Proper duration of exercises
115
ACQUISITIONS OF LANGUAGE 49 Oral Language involves the Voice and the Ear
117
Operation of Special Interest in lingual acquisitions it 53 Elocution involves an Ear for Cadence
118
Written language appeals to the sense of Visible Form it 55 Short methods of acquiring language it 56 Verbal adhesiveness an aid to the memory of e...
119
Knowledge as Science is clothed in artificial symbols it 58 The Object Sciences are Concrete or Abstract it 59 The Subject Sciences are grounded on s...
120
Circumstances favouring acquirements in mental Science i7 61 Supposed faculty of SelfConsciousness
121
Acquirements in the higher branches of Industry
122
Fine Art constructions give refined pleasure ib 64 Conditions of Acquisition in Fine Art
123
History the suceession of events as narrated it 66 Transactions witnessed impress themselves as Sensations and Actions
124
AGREEMENTLAW OF SIMILARITY
127
Sight Colours Forms and their combinations
136
I Definition
143
Figures of Similitude abound in all great works of literary
149
This case sufficiently expressed under the Law of Similarity
155
CONSTRUCTIVE ASSOCIATION
161
CONSTRUCTIVENESS IN THE SENSATIONS
166
Construction of Sentences
168
Emotional
172
1 Material
178
THE ORIGIN OF KNOWLEDGE EXPERIENCE AND INTUITION PiOE 1 Question as to the existence of Intuitive or Innate truths
181
Importance attached to the Intuitive origin of knowledge ii
182
Innate ideas improbable
184
Innate general ideas would require innate particulars id
186
the Theory of Vision and the Percep tion of the External and Material World
188
Two views of our Perception of Distance by sight ii
189
The visible signs of variation of Distance from the eye ii
190
Experience associates tho visible signs of Distance with the movements that give the meaning of Distance
191
Distance an inference Experiments of Wheatstone ii
192
Admission by Berkeleys opponents that the instinctive percep tion is aided by associations
193
Objection to the theory of Acquired Perception that we axe not conscious of tactual or locomotive reminiscences
194
Observations on persona born blind and made to see
196
Hypothesis of hereditary transmission of the perception
197
PERCEPTION OP A MATERIAL WORLD
198
Energies
199
Hume Summary of his philosophical doctrines generally
207
The NkoPlatonists The Moral End to be attained through
208
THE EMOTIONS
215
manifestations in the Lower Animals forms
263
The search after Knowledge
272
Circumstances favouring Sympathy
278
Ideal Emotion is affected by Organic states
284
These are the pleasures aimed at in the Fine Arts
290
Music
296
It is a principle in Art to leave something to Desire
302
associated emotions or affections
309
The causes of Laughter
315
A link has to be formed between actions and feelings
322
Sensations of the Alimentary Canal
327
CONTROL OF FEELINGS AND THOUGHTS
338
Command of the Thoughts a means of controlling the Feelings
344
Conflict of concurring pleasures and pains
354
Resolution is postponed action
363
1 the wants of the system 2
369
CHAP
375
THE MORAL HABITS
385
PBUDENCE DUTY MORAL INABILITY
392
The perplexity of the question is owing to the inaptness of
398
Meanings of Choice Deliberation Selfdetermination Moral
405
Pelaoius and Arminius ii
411
Jonathan Edwahds Vindicates Philosophical Necessity
417
ETHICS
429
The Bonum Summum Bokum or Happiness
432
V
433
The Ethical End is limited according to the view taken of Moral
438
Objections against Utility LHappiness is not the sole
444
The peculiar attribute of Bightness arises from the institution
455
Thirdly Moral right and wrong is not an indivisible property
461
Plato Review of the Dialogues containing portions of Ethical
471
the Mean
481
Book Fourth Liberality Magnificence Magnanimity Mild
490
Book Seventh Gradations of moral strength and moral weakness
500
Grounds of Friendship
506
Kpicitbtjs life and writings His successors Virtue and vice
525
Hobbes Abstract of the Ethical part of Leviathan Constitu
543
Cumberland Standard of Moral Good summed up in Benevolence
556
Clarke The eternal Fitness and Unfitness of Things determine
562
Hcme Question whether Season or Sentiment be the foundation
607
Price The distinctions of Bight and Wrong are perceived by
617
Adam Smith Illustration of the workings of Sympathy Mutual
631
Stbwabt The Moral Faculty an original power Criticism
639
Bmoww Moral approbation a simple emotion of the mind Univer
646
Bkntham Utility the sole foundation of Morals Principles
669
Mackintosh Universality of Moral Distinctions Antithesis
677
Austin Laws defined and classified The Divine Laws how
686
Whewell Opposing schemes of Morality Proposal to reconcile
697
Kant Distinguishes between the empirical and the rational mode
726
Cousis Analysis of the sentiments aroused in us by human
740
JotTFXOr Each creature has a special nature and a special
746
All Perception or Knowledge implies mind
1
The Perception of Matter a distinct attitude of the consciousness 198
3
The influence of Belief a tost of strength of feeling
4
Higher Combinations of language
6
Classification of the kinds of Food
8
Spontaneous Activity of the system Proofs and illustrations 14
14
The several indications mutually check each other
19
Aristotle Enters his protest against separating Universals from
21
Locke General terms tho signs of general ideas 27
27
Brows A general word designates certain particulars together
30
Realism and Conceptualism 180
31
The Schoolmen Opposing views were held The question
49
Kant His position as between the opposing schools Maintained
58
Bcffieb His anticipation of Reid Defines Common Sense
62
Events narrated have the aid of the Verbal Memory
67
Hamilton Common Sense another name for the final appeal
68
Enumeration of primary Pleasures and Pains Important distinc
78
The Intellectual Powers Aquinas Reid Stewart Brown
88
Sensation Expresses various contrasting phenomena 94
94

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 657 - Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.
Page 700 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
Page 203 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Page 548 - ... that a man be willing, when others are so too, as far forth, as for peace, and defence of himself he shall think it necessary, to lay down this right to all things; and be contented with so much liberty against other men, as he would allow other men against himself.
Page 653 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Page 657 - The principle of utility recognises this subjection, and assumes it for the foundation of that system, the object of which is to rear the fabric of felicity by the hands of reason and of law. Systems which attempt to question it, deal in sounds instead of sense, in caprice instead of reason, in darkness instead of light.
Page 547 - The RIGHT OF NATURE, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything which in his own judgment and reason he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto.
Page 731 - ... the idea of the will of every rational being as a will giving universal law.
Page 26 - Likewise the idea of man that I frame to myself must be either of a white, or a black, or a tawny, a straight, or a crooked, a tall, or a low, or a middle-sized man.
Page 411 - In this then consists freedom, viz. in our being able to act or not to act, according as we shall choose or will.

Bibliographic information