The Holocaust in American Life (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sep 20, 2000 - History - 384 pages
7 Reviews
Prize-winning historian Peter Novick illuminates the reasons Americans ignored the Holocaust for so long -- how dwelling on German crimes interfered with Cold War mobilization; how American Jews, not wanting to be thought of as victims, avoided the subject. He explores in absorbing detail the decisions that later moved the Holocaust to the center of American life: Jewish leaders invoking its memory to muster support for Israel and to come out on top in a sordid competition over what group had suffered most; politicians using it to score points with Jewish voters. With insight and sensitivity, Novick raises searching questions about these developments. Have American Jews, by making the Holocaust the emblematic Jewish experience, given Hitler a posthumous victory, tacitly endorsing his definition of Jews as despised pariahs? Does the Holocaust really teach useful lessons and sensitize us to atrocities, or, by making the Holocaust the measure, does it make lesser crimes seem "not so bad"? What are we to make of the fact that while Americans spend hundreds of millions of dollars for museums recording a European crime, there is no museum of American slavery?
  

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Review: The Holocaust in American Life

User Review  - Robert Davis - Goodreads

An extremely interesting (and controversial) look into the development of the Holocaust as a central point of importance to the American Jewish community. Read full review

Review: The Holocaust in American Life

User Review  - Katherine Baber - Goodreads

Useful, but not good history. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

THE WAR YEARS
17
THE POSTWAR YEARS
61
THE YEARS 0F TRANSITION
125
RECENT YEARS
205
FUTURE YEARS
265
Back Matter
283
Back Cover
377
Spine
378
Copyright

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Page 15 - For if once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing ; and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbath-breaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination.
Page 4 - To understand something historically is to be aware of its complexity, to have sufficient detachment to see it from multiple perspectives, to accept the ambiguities, including moral ambiguities, of protagonists' motives and behavior. Collective memory simplifies; sees events from a single, committed perspective; is impatient with ambiguities of any kind; reduces events to mythic archetypes. Historical consciousness, by its nature...
Page 3 - An event in the subject's life defined by its intensity, by the subject's incapacity to respond adequately to it, and by the upheaval and long-lasting effects that it brings about in the psychical organization.

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About the author (2000)

Peter Novick is professor of history at the University of Chicago. He is the author of The Resistance Versus Vichy and That Noble Dream: The Objectivity Question and the American Historical Profession, which won the American Historical Association's prize for the best book of the year in American history.

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