Journal of the Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in [of] the State of New York, Issues 1-34 (Google eBook)

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The Diocese, 1844 - Anglican Communion
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Page 56 - Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday, and other holy-days, according to God's holy will and pleasure and the orders of the Church of England prescribed in that behalf; that is, in hearing the Word of God read and taught ; in private and public prayers; in acknowledging their offences to God, and amendment of the same; in reconciling...
Page 140 - REV. JOHN HENRY HOBART, DD, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of New York, -with a Memoir of his Life by the Rev.
Page 437 - Who gave himself for our sins, that he might deliver us from this present evil world, according to the will of God and our Father: 5. To whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.
Page 212 - We, whose names are underwritten, fully sensible how important it is that the sacred office of a Bishop should not be unworthily conferred, and firmly persuaded that it is our duty to bear testimony on this solemn occasion without partiality or affection, do, in the presence of Almighty God, testify, that...
Page 51 - A Protestant Episcopal Church in any of the United States, not now represented, may, at any time hereafter, be admitted, on acceding to this Constitution.
Page 385 - Christians, that they may be led into the way of truth, and hold the faith in unity of spirit and in the bond of peace.
Page 212 - ... life ; and that we do not know or believe there is any impediment on account of which he ought not to be consecrated to that Holy Office.
Page 110 - Creed, and that which is commonly called the Apostles' Creed, ought thoroughly to be received and believed: for they may be proved by most certain warrants of holy Scripture.
Page 63 - When any member is about to speak in debate, or deliver any matter to the House, he shall rise from his seat, and respectfully address himself to "Mr. Speaker," and shall confine himself to the question under debate, and avoid personality.
Page 110 - Parliament, doth contain all things necessary to such Consecration and Ordering; neither hath it any thing that of itself is superstitious or ungodly.

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