Politics in Brazil, 1930-1964: an experiment in democracy

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Oxford University Press, 1967 - Political Science - 446 pages
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This book follows three decades of democratic experimentation--and the rise and fall of constitutional government--in Brazil. Beginning with Getulio Vargas' fifteen-year rule and ending with the coup d'etat that ousted President Joao Goulart from office in 1964, Skidmore sets political events in the context of social and economic factors to show how the problems posed by economic expansion, an unfavorable trade balance, inequitable land distribution, and shifting political power have profoundly affected Brazil's growth and stability.

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Contents

The Vargas Era 19301945
3
19301935
12
The End of the Estado Novo and the Dutra Years
48
Copyright

17 other sections not shown

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About the author (1967)

Thomas E. Skidmore is Carlos Manuel de Cespedes Professor of Modern Latin American History and Director of the Center for Modern Latin American Studies at Brown University.
Peter H. Smith is Professor of Political Science, Simon Bolivar Professor of Latin American Studies, and Director of Latin American Studies at the University of California, San Diego.

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