The lives of the lord chancellors and keepers of the Great Seal of England, from the earliest times till the reign of King George IV. (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1847 - Judges
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Page 377 - Why, Sir, if you were to read Richardson for the story, your impatience would be so much fretted that you would hang yourself. But you must read him for the sentiment, and consider the story as only giving occasion to the sentiment.
Page 10 - And that there is all Nature cries aloud Through all her works he must delight in virtue, And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 146 - And thou shalt not glean thy vineyard, neither shalt thou gather every grape of thy vineyard ; thou shalt leave them for the poor and stranger : I am the Lord your God.
Page 452 - The life of a modern soldier is ill represented by heroic fiction. War has means of destruction more formidable than the cannon and the sword. Of the thousands and ten thousands that perished in our late contests with France and Spain, a very small part ever felt the stroke of an enemy ; the rest languished in tents and ships, amidst damps and putrefaction ; pale, torpid, spiritless and helpless ; gasping and groaning, unpitied among men, made obdurate by long continuance of hopeless misery ; and...
Page 431 - ERSKINE. Your Lordship may proceed in what manner you think fit. I know my duty as well as your Lordship knows yours. I shall not alter my conduct.
Page 419 - A combination and a form indeed, Where every god did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man: This was your husband.
Page 431 - Brougham now moved for a rule to show cause why the verdict should not be set aside, and a new trial granted...
Page 654 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 446 - said the jealous ruler over the desert, encroached upon by the restless foot of English adventure, "who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains, and to empty itself into the ocean? Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer?
Page 448 - It is the nature of everything that is great and useful, both in the animate and inanimate world, to be wild and irregular, and we must be contented to take them with the alloys which belong to them, or live without them. Genius breaks from the fetters of criticism, but its wanderings are sanctioned by its majesty and wisdom, when it advances in its path ; subject it to the critic, and you tame it into dulness.

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