The Majors (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Nov 15, 1986 - Fiction - 384 pages
18 Reviews
Dien Bien Phu. Saigon. Hanoi. In 1954, they were only exotic names from a French campaign halfway around the world. But now American fighting men--proven on the bloody beaches of Normandy and in the minefields of Korea--are summoned to help beat back the guerilla forces of Ho Chi Minh. To some, the "secret" war in Indochina was the depth of folly. To others, like the Majors, it pointed to the heights of glory...
  

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Review: The Majors (Brotherhood of War #3)

User Review  - Robin Halvorson - Goodreads

just reread this book -- I like it that much. Read full review

Review: The Majors (Brotherhood of War #3)

User Review  - David Ward - Goodreads

The Majors (Brotherhood of War #3) by WEB Griffin (Jove 1983) (Fiction - Military). Now that the Korean Conflict is under control, there's a new brushfire in French Indochina which they call Viet Nam. My rating: 7/10, finished 1983. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
19
Section 3
47
Section 4
69
Section 5
97
Section 6
123
Section 7
141
Section 8
167
Section 11
229
Section 12
249
Section 13
265
Section 14
293
Section 15
309
Section 16
325
Section 17
345
Section 18
363

Section 9
187
Section 10
205
Section 19
377
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

"W.E.B. Griffin is a storyteller in the grand tradition, probably the best man around for describing the military community"—Tom Clancy

W.E.B. Griffin is the author of more than thirty epic novels in five series, all of which have been listed on The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly and other best-seller lists. More than forty million of his books are in print in more than ten languages, including Hebrew, Chinese, Japanese, and Hungarian.

Mr. Griffin grew up in the suburbs of New York City and Philadelphia. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1946. After basic training, he received counter-intelligence training at Fort Holabird, Maryland. He was assigned to the Army of Occupation in Germany, and ultimately to the staff of then-Major General I.D. White, commander of the U.S. Constabulary.

In 1951, Mr. Griffin was recalled to active duty for the Korean War, interrupting his education at Phillips University, Marburg an der Lahn, Germany. In Korea he earned the Combat Infantry Badge as a combat correspondent and later served as acting X Corps (Group) information officer under Lieutenant General White.

On his release from active duty in 1953, Mr. Griffin was appointed Chief of the Publications Division of the U.S. Army Signal Aviation Test & Support Activity at Fort Rucker, Alabama.

Mr. Griffin is a member of the Special Operations Association, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, the Army Aviation Association, and the Armor Association.

He was the 1991 recipient of the Brigadier General Robert L. Dening Memorial Distinguished Service Award of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Correspondents Association, and the August 1999 recipient of the Veterans of Foreign Wars News Media Award, presented at the 100th National Convention in Kansas City.

He has been vested into the Order of St. George of the U.S. Armor Association, and the Order of St. Andrew of the U.S. Army Aviation Association, and been awarded Honorary Doctoral degrees by Norwich University, the nation's first and oldest private military college, and by Troy State University (Ala.). He was the graduation dinner speaker for the class of 1988 at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

He has been awarded honorary membership in the Special Forces Association; the Marine Corps Combat Correspondents Association; the Marine Raiders Association; and the U.S. Army Otter & Caribou Association.

He is the co-founder, with historian Colonel Carlo D'Este, of the William E. Colby Seminar on Intelligence, Military, and Diplomatic Affairs. (www.norwich.edu/symposium/)

Mr. Griffin's novels, known for their historical accuracy, have been praised by The Philadelphia Inquirer for their "fierce, stop-for-nothing scenes."

"Nothing honors me more than a serviceman, veteran, or cop telling me he enjoys reading my books," Mr. Griffin says.

Mr. Griffin divides his time between the Gulf Coast and Buenos Aires.

Bibliographic information