Coffee: A Dark History

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2005 - Cooking - 323 pages
73 Reviews
A five-hundred-year history of coffee draws on sources in alchemy, anthropology, politics, and other disciplines to document coffee's identity as one of the most valuable legally traded commodities in the world, tracing its origins in fifteenth-century East Africa, its rise as an imperial consumer product, its role in commercialism and social disruption, and more. 15,000 first printing.
  

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Review: Coffee: A Dark History

User Review  - Cody - Goodreads

Great history and better writing. Looks at coffee history with a special emphasis on justice. Author is unapologetic about taking significant detours to dwell on subjects he is especially fascinated ... Read full review

Review: Coffee: A Dark History

User Review  - Goodreads

Great history and better writing. Looks at coffee history with a special emphasis on justice. Author is unapologetic about taking significant detours to dwell on subjects he is especially fascinated ... Read full review

Contents

The Way We Live Now
1
Origins
17
Enter the Dragon
34
The Mocha Trade
65
Coffee and Societies
84
The Fall of Mocha
98
Slavery and the Coffee Colonies
118
The Continental System and Napoleons Alternative to Coffee
141
Modern Times
192
Coffee Science and History
212
The Battle of the Hemispheres
226
Fair Trade
257
Espresso the Esperanto of Coffee
271
The Heart of Darkness
285
Coda
299
Appendix The Find at Kush
307

Napoleon and St Helena
149
Slavery Brazil and Coffee
170
The Great Exhibition
176
Harar and Rimbaud the Cradle and the Crucible
183

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About the author (2005)

Wild is a director of the East India Company and an undisputed authority on its history. In addition, he is a member of the Musicians Union; the Performing Rights Society; the Guild of Food Writers; the British Actors' Equity Association; the Broadcasting, Entertainment, Cinematograph, and Theatre Union; and an honorary member of the Chocolate Society.

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