O Brave New Words!: Native American Loanwords in Current English

Front Cover
University of Oklahoma Press, Feb 1, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 304 pages
1 Review

Native American loanwords are a crucial, though little acknowledged, part of the English language. This book shows how the more than one-thousand current loanwords were adopted and demonstrates how the changing relationships between Indians and European settlers can be traced in the rate of loanword borrowing and the kinds of words adopted.

Appalachian: from the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States, from the Muskogean name of the Apalachee tribe of Florida

Moose: Eastern Abenaki mos; Papoose: Narragansett papoos, child; Squash: Narragansett askutasquash; Texas: from a Caddo word, meaning "friends" or "allies."

  

What people are saying - Write a review

O brave new words!: Native American loanwords in current English

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The European settlers acquired many indispensable words from Native Americans, among them names of plants, animals, and food. Cutler organizes this wealth of language along historical lines. Read full review

Contents

Voyage into a New Awareness
3
Adventurers and Settlers
14
A Forest of Languages
23
Wild Beasts and Willd Men
32
First Words from the New World
44
Reports from the Frontier
53
Renaming a Continent
67
Opening Up the West
79
Words along the Fiery War Trail
102
Indianisms in Current English
123
The Twentieth Century and Beyond
136
Epilogue
152
English Loanwords from the Eskimo
217
Notes
248
Bibliography
257
Index
275

Of Kayaks and Igloos
92

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Charles L. Cutler is also the author of Connecticut's Revolutionary Press .

Bibliographic information