The New York Review, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
George Dearborn & Co., 1838 - Bibliography
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Page 51 - Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us. Thou that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us. Thou that takest away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. Thou that sittest at the right hand of God the Father, have mercy upon us. For Thou only art holy ; Thou only art the Lord ; Thou only, O Christ, with the Holy Ghost, art most high in the glory of God the Father. Amen.
Page 301 - The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published.
Page 501 - Governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them ; and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them they are ruined too. Wherefore governments rather depend upon men, than men upon governments. Let men be good, and the government cannot be bad; if it be ill, they will cure it. But if men be bad, let the government be never so good, they will endeavour to warp and spoil it to their turn.
Page 457 - God hath made of one blood all nations of men to dwell on the face of the earth...
Page 79 - Cavallo, in Italy, April 20th, 1822, aged five years and three months. ' I shall go to her, but she shall not return to me.
Page 302 - To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was formerly done, both before and since the revolution, is to subject all freedom of sentiment to the prejudices of one man, and make him the arbitrary and infallible judge of all controverted points in learning, religion, and government.
Page 68 - For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Page 317 - But now the right of making such returns is denied, and they are punished as breaches of the peace: while the right of abusing seems to remain in full force, the laws made against it being rendered ineffectual by the liberty of the press. My proposal then is...
Page 316 - Their support is founded in the depravity of such minds as have not been mended by religion, nor improved by good education. There is a lust in man no charm can tame, Of loudly publishing his neighbor's shame. Hence : On eagle's wings immortal scandals fly, While virtuous actions are but born and die.
Page 195 - In fact, the Indians that I have had an opportunity of seeing in real life are quite different from those described in poetry. They are by no means the stoics that they are represented; taciturn, unbending, without a tear or a smile.

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