The Dublin Magazine, Volume 1, Part 2 (Google eBook)

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J. P. Doyle, 1842
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Page 292 - ... and unbosom now That which is most within me, could I wreak My thoughts upon expression, and thus throw Soul, heart, mind, passions, feelings strong or weak, All that I would have sought, and all I seek, Bear, know, feel, and yet breathe into one word, And that one word were Lightning, I would speak ; But as it is, I live and die unheard, With a most voiceless thought, sheathing it as a sword.
Page 287 - Oh ! many are the Poets that are sown By Nature ; men endowed with highest gifts, The vision and the faculty divine ; .Yet wanting the accomplishment of verse...
Page 105 - I say, that there is not a single treaty they have ever made which they have not broken. Thirdly, I say, that there is not a single prince or state, who ever put any trust in the Company, who is not utterly ruined...
Page 78 - WE HAVE NO NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; we are ruled by Englishmen, and the servants of Englishmen, whose object is the interest of another country, whose instrument is corruption, and whose strength is the weakness of Ireland...
Page 325 - Secondly, nearly all these young ladies subscribe to circulating libraries. Thirdly, they have got up among themselves a periodical called THE LOWELL OFFERING, "A repository of original articles, written exclusively by females actively employed in the mills...
Page 324 - These girls, as I have said, were all well dressed : and that phrase necessarily includes extreme cleanliness. They ' had serviceable bonnets, good warm cloaks and shawls ; and were not above clogs and pattens. Moreover, there were places in the mill in which they could deposit these things without injury ; and there were conveniences for washing. They were healthy in appearance, many of them remarkably so, and had the manners and deportment of young women : not of degraded brutes of burden.
Page 93 - It is the business of the speculative philosopher to mark the proper ends of government. It is the business of the politician, who is the philosopher in action, to find out proper means towards those ends. and to employ them with effect.
Page 325 - ... which is duly printed, published, and sold : and whereof I brought away from Lowell four hundred good solid pages, which I have read from beginning to end. The large class of readers, startled by these facts, will exclaim, with one voice. " How very preposterous ! " On my deferentially inquiring why, they will answer, " These things are above their station.
Page 93 - Party is a body of men united, for promoting by their joint endeavours the national interest, upon some particular principle in which they are all agreed.
Page 324 - The rooms in which they worked, were as well ordered as themselves. In the windows of some there were green plants, which were trained to shade the glass : in all, there was as much fresh air, cleanliness, and comfort, as the nature of the occupation would possibly admit of.

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